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ice baths for recovery

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  • ice baths for recovery

    Ive been following the provided training schedule by the seal/swcc website and with that training sometimes near 4 times a day has taken a toll on my recovery and body, I just thought ice baths might be a good supplement to my training to help in recovery, what do ya guys think? if anyone has any advice in optimal recovery strategies pls let me know. thanks

  • #2
    I think if you are continuing to make progress in training you are recovering just fine.

    If you are not, you may need some program adjustment.

    Honestly there is no special recovery tool, no secret technique, no “one weird trick” that’s going to give you “more recovery”. Objective recovery is measured in training outcomes and if that’s going fine then your recovery is fine and you don’t need to “do” anything to help facilitate it, other than optimize what we know actually works: sleeping and eating. There is no data suggesting that ice baths improve performance and thereby do not improve recovery. They do provide a strong placebo effect and may temporarily reduce inflammation causing pain. They’re actually great after a football game or if you are extremely sore in that they may help you feel less sore. Honestly if there is anything you should do to help yourself feel better it should involve heat. Hot tubs, massage, sauna etc are easy ways. They won’t “give” you more recovery or improve performance if you are healthy, but they may help you feel better and relaxed. Nothing wrong with a cold plunge though if that’s what you prefer.

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    • #3
      thank you very much for the feedback i'l definently look into those options, but just one last thing, if training in atleast some capacity all 7 days of the week is too much then should i just reduce training to six times or go a little less intense with most of my workouts and opt for volume over intensity? i'm just trying not to get caught in overtraining or breaking myself down too much as i understand that would be a pretty big problem when/if i finally arrive at buds, thanks.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by David579 View Post
        thank you very much for the feedback i'l definently look into those options, but just one last thing, if training in atleast some capacity all 7 days of the week is too much then should i just reduce training to six times or go a little less intense with most of my workouts and opt for volume over intensity? i'm just trying not to get caught in overtraining or breaking myself down too much as i understand that would be a pretty big problem when/if i finally arrive at buds, thanks.
        I think it’s important to define what “too much” actually is and go from there. So I pose the question: how are you defining “too much” in this context for yourself?

        If your training program is allowing you to make progress is the areas you need it to, then I suggest not changing anything until it needs to be changed. Unless you’re needing a mental break and change of pace, rearrangement of your sessions to accommodate your schedule, or you experience consistent drops in training progress or even regression, I wouldn’t change anything.
        Last edited by tfranc; 07-17-2018, 09:54 AM.

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        • #5
          There are a lot of vague statements concerning the training regimen. Everyone is different and can manage different states of muscular stress. As tfranc stated above, ice reduces the negative side effects of inflammation such as soreness and pain. Recovery is a complicated system of events that includes anerobic respiration and its accompanying byproducts, primarily llactic acid build up. As result, the given information is difficult to provide a valid conclusion.

          T. Silver

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Ts1234 View Post
            There are a lot of vague statements concerning the training regimen. Everyone is different and can manage different states of muscular stress. As tfranc stated above, ice reduces the negative side effects of inflammation such as soreness and pain. Recovery is a complicated system of events that includes anerobic respiration and its accompanying byproducts, primarily llactic acid build up. As result, the given information is difficult to provide a valid conclusion.

            T. Silver
            But even so, there is zero data to suggest that taking ice baths increase or help maintain performance, especially long term, which when looking objectively at recovery from training stress means that ice baths do not increase or “give someone more recovery”. There is even an argument to be made that chronic soreness is indicative of a lack of adaptation to training stress and can be a symptom of poor sleep/diet or inconsistent training stress, or outright overtraining in endurance sport (though this is harder to accomplish than most believe). This is why ice baths come in handy after a football game or some kind of athletic test - because the stress is inconsistent with what your body should be used to experiencing in terms of type and progressive overload, thereby making you sore as hell. The ice baths provide physical relief from said soreness

            Not trying to argue with you, just having a discussion about fitness n stuff.
            Last edited by tfranc; 07-19-2018, 08:09 PM.

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            • #7
              Recent studies have come forward saying how the best time to use ice baths would be when repeated peak performance is needed. For example in BUDS when everyday is hard day or in sports during the playoffs. The studies showed that when used during training there was significantly less muscle hypertrophy in the group that took ice baths. They said this was due to ice baths inhibiting some parts of the bodies natural inflammatory response. If I were you only since you are in training, try to let the body heal itself which will make you stronger. Only ice bath if you are feeling extremely sore or have an injury.

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