Announcement

Collapse

New Combat Side Stroke Guide

Improve your swim. Use the Naval Special Warfare Combat Side Stroke Guide.

Visit: http://www.sealswcc.com/navy-seal-co...oke-guide.html
See more
See less

Run Training and Calorie Burning

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Run Training and Calorie Burning

    I am a Senior in HS. I ship out July 9th but I am not planning to go into BUDs until after NUC and Officer school. I am running into a health problem though. I have a high metabolism and I know it has been slowing down some, however, I am trying to get my pushups and pullups up but I have plateaued right at the minimum standards for the enlisted PST scores. I went to GNC for some advice (even though GNC is not always a reliable source) and got some straight carbs to go along with my 2-a-day protein shakes. So, altogether I am getting all the protein, carbs, and am trying to work on the calories. Altogether, I eat 4 times a day.

    Now for the problem. Running burns a lot of calories. I don't need to burn more calories because of my high metabolism but I know that not training for my run times isn't exactly the best way to go either. I am already good at running, (I run a 9:36s 1.5 mile run), so I don't think cutting back will hurt me too much until I can get past this plateau. Can someone give some advice on whether I need to continue my run time training and if so, how can I either 1. slow down my metabolism or 2. increase my calorie count?


    All comments are greatly appreciated. :)

  • #2
    Working out altogether will increase your metabolism. And since you will not be allowed supplements during training, I would recommend you try to cut it out.

    That being said, you should eat only a few fast burning carbs pre-workout and then include foods high in fats and omegas (fish and steak) to help give you long lasting energy and recovery post-workout. Maybe it will help you with your high intake problem. Be sure to include good fillers like rice and veggies as 2/3 of your meal.

    I've read recently that beet juice/beet pills help with your cardiovascular performance during high end workouts.

    I take Meal replacements or Casein (slow digesting protien) with whole milk right before bed to fill in my missing calories during the day. Your body slows down at night, so it's best to not carb load before bed. (Check the ingredients in your products to make sure this isn't the case)

    KEEP Running/Swimming/Cardio!
    Your heart and muscles will thank you in the long run. Cardio helps build endurance, which you will rely on heavily during training.

    Respectfully
    CH

    Comment


    • #3
      If you keep up the same routine day-in, day-out, you’re almost certain to plateau. I don’t know how you’re currently training, but it’s always a good idea to switch up your routine every so often to avoid plateaus. For instance, if you do 4x30 of the same type of push-up every workout, you will reach a point where you stop improving. Personally, including sets of pushups and pull-ups until failure have increased my scores dramatically In addition to including sets of wide and narrow grips. Hopefully that helps a bit in upping your scores.

      Comment


      • #4
        If your plateau is at good numbers (80+ push ups/ 15+ pull ups) then I would purchase a weight vest and try weighted calisthenics.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by tactical_athlete View Post
          If your plateau is at good numbers (80+ push ups/ 15+ pull ups) then I would purchase a weight vest and try weighted calisthenics.
          I did purchase the weight vest, I am thinking about using on everything though. Ill give it a month and see where I improve. Im at 72 reps on both pushups and situps and i am at 11 pullups. I did a sprint run when I first got home with it and I can definately tell a difference already!!!

          Comment


          • #6
            Low carb / Lean protein powder is more expensive, and I would bet thats where the GNC salesman pointed you. Without knowing your height/weight/ability, it sounds like you need to add size. Go buy some mass gainer, sip on two servings a day and eat three balanced meals around 500 cals each. Your last sip is when you go to bed, that way your body has what it needs to recover while you sleep.

            Easiest way to add mass is to weight train, this means free weights and compounds lifts, or weighted vest like suggested above. 8-12 upper body, with some 15-20 here and there. 4-8 squat/pull. Your body naturally will add weight to your frame if you're bearing extra load, so you'll put on mass. Whereas if you're just using your body weight then your body will prefer to strengthen what you have, rather than add tons more mass that it has to adapt to. It doesn't take much to spark muscular adaptation, so don't kill yourself but get after it. The other option would be to vary your calisthenic workouts in pyramids, and play with rest time. Either way, if you don't know where to start check out the PTG.

            Exercises that I found skyrocketed my:

            pushups: Dumbell press, shoulder press, dips, heavy straight bar push-downs.
            pullups: strict weight pull ups, heavy negative lat pulldown, high rep rows all angles
            sit-ups: PTG, very long planks

            And make sure you do rotator cuff exercises, good luck.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by b16fy View Post
              Low carb / Lean protein powder is more expensive, and I would bet thats where the GNC salesman pointed you. Without knowing your height/weight/ability, it sounds like you need to add size. Go buy some mass gainer, sip on two servings a day and eat three balanced meals around 500 cals each. Your last sip is when you go to bed, that way your body has what it needs to recover while you sleep.

              Easiest way to add mass is to weight train, this means free weights and compounds lifts, or weighted vest like suggested above. 8-12 upper body, with some 15-20 here and there. 4-8 squat/pull. Your body naturally will add weight to your frame if you're bearing extra load, so you'll put on mass. Whereas if you're just using your body weight then your body will prefer to strengthen what you have, rather than add tons more mass that it has to adapt to. It doesn't take much to spark muscular adaptation, so don't kill yourself but get after it. The other option would be to vary your calisthenic workouts in pyramids, and play with rest time. Either way, if you don't know where to start check out the PTG.

              Exercises that I found skyrocketed my:

              pushups: Dumbell press, shoulder press, dips, heavy straight bar push-downs.
              pullups: strict weight pull ups, heavy negative lat pulldown, high rep rows all angles
              sit-ups: PTG, very long planks

              And make sure you do rotator cuff exercises, good luck.
              What are some good rotator cuff excercises. I've never even thought about working those so I have no clue at all??

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Kamaron Swain View Post

                What are some good rotator cuff excercises. I've never even thought about working those so I have no clue at all??
                Google resistance band rotator cuff routines. Pretty simple, takes like 5-10 minutes. Big boost to shoulder stability which helps maintain strict movements when you're using weight for upper body movements.

                Comment

                Working...
                X