Announcement

Collapse

New Combat Side Stroke Guide

Improve your swim. Use the Naval Special Warfare Combat Side Stroke Guide.

Visit: http://www.sealswcc.com/navy-seal-co...oke-guide.html
See more
See less

CSS Critique Requested

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • CSS Critique Requested

    I am requesting critique of my CSS form. This was shot at the end of training week 9. 450m time is 11:50.

    During the 450m, I notice my glides after kicking off of the walls are getting shorter (from ~11m at the beginning to ~5 at the end). Any advice to fight the urge for air (allowing me to glide further) in the later part of the swim? Advice beyond, "just don't go up for air" would be most helpful.

    YouTube link to 50m critique video: https://youtu.be/DVAge1r0J-8

  • #2
    On the breathing aspect, it looks like youre constantly breathing out on your kick off the wall. Hold it for a couple seconds and then do a big forceful exhale. Time it where you finish the exhale right when you turn your head to breathe. You are also mixing a scissor and breast stoke kick pick one and go with it. Turns are also slow and your double arm pull out isnt getting you anywhere. Do kickboard drills and research the double arm pull tutorial its on here somewhere. Lastly your top arm isn't grabbing as much water as it could. Picture it as an oar and try to grab as much water as possible.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by dblackamdg View Post
      On the breathing aspect, it looks like youre constantly breathing out on your kick off the wall. Hold it for a couple seconds and then do a big forceful exhale. Time it where you finish the exhale right when you turn your head to breathe. You are also mixing a scissor and breast stoke kick pick one and go with it. Turns are also slow and your double arm pull out isnt getting you anywhere. Do kickboard drills and research the double arm pull tutorial its on here somewhere. Lastly your top arm isn't grabbing as much water as it could. Picture it as an oar and try to grab as much water as possible.
      Thank you for the prompt reply.

      I've been using the breast stroke kick only in arm recovery after the kick off of the wall (I've seen this in a number of videos posted by Stew Smith, but I have also seen a lot using scissor kick at this point). I will work switch to a scissor at this recovery to see how that feels.

      I wasn't focused on turning quickly; I definitely took my sweet time. I don't do that when racing the clock.

      I have recently noticed the double-arm pull doing little for me. As suggested I will look up a tutorial and work on that.

      As for the top arm, it sounds like keeping it straight and against the body throughout the pull would be the best way to go about that.

      For each stroke I slowly exhale throughout the entire stroke. When I turn my head I am ready for an inhale. Should I hold it for a few seconds through each stroke and do a forceful exhale before I am ready to turn my head? I have heard/seen both thoughts.

      Comment


      • #4
        What I meant by combining breastroke and scissor kick is your actual kick looks like a mixture of both. Your recovery breastroke kick looks good and is a good thing, but its the kicks during your stroke that look like a combination of both that's why I suggested kickboard drills.

        Also yes keep your arm pretty much straight but no need to keep it close to your body. Look at this guys top arm pull and try to replicate that. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F7d9hiewkaU&t=339s

        Also when it comes to breathing during your stroke its whatever youre most comfortable with. I just said hold it for a couple off the wall because you said that distance tends to shorten as you get tired. Holding it for bit off the wall might help with that.

        Comment


        • #5
          not really anything you can do about wanting to breathe during the glide. but when you breath between strokes make sure your not looking straight up at the ceiling. and lastly a way i got good at the stroke is dont torque your body to face the bottom of the pool after a kick, instead swim on your side the whole way down facing the same wall the whole swim( so switching sides each length). this will almost force you to scissor kick almost perfectly as long as you dont open it up too much and youll see that breathing while swimming on your side will be a lot more relaxing and natural< also when you bring the hands up to above your head making a praying shape with your hands and keep it as close to your body as possible

          Comment


          • #6
            You look like you have the strength to really push through the water. That's a good thing, but on a medium haul swim like a 500, you need to have better form.
            The biggest things have already been covered. They're along the lines of:
            1. Work on your kick. As Dblack said, you're combining a breaststroke/scissor kick. The result is you're catching less water with you legs, and getting less thrust, because you're kind of in between. To work on this, try to move the most water with the front and back of your legs, as opposed to the side. I know that it feels like you're getting more water with the side of your foot, but you aren't.
            2. Work on your streamline. You and I are bigger guys- we can't rocket through the pool like some of these beanpoles with no drag!(kidding)
            The biggest issue I see with your streamline is your constant turning through the water. Around every time you kick, your upper body goes from sideways to flat, then back to sideways for the next kick. Each of those movements slows you down.
            Things that can help with this: Get comfortable keeping your body sideways. Try to avoid looking at the bottom of the pool. I generally alternate which side I'm on every 50 to help with muscle fatigue. As for the rest of your body, once you've kicked, make sure your hands are all the way our and your head is tucked and down. Keep your toes pointed and heels together, and just glide for a second. Start counting the amount of strokes in your 25, and make a goal to reduce them. Speed comes with efficiency. That was one of the hardest things to learn for me- I still struggle with it when I get tired.
            Slow is smooth, and smooth is fast.

            Edit: Find somebody nearby who knows what they're doing(swim coach, SEAL, whatever), and ask them to work with you 1 on 1. I'm sure they'd be happy to help you out.

            Comment


            • #7
              Coach Freddy here. I reviewed the video.

              Here are the issues I see:

              1 - Streamline. It's hamstrung by a lack of shoulder flexibility. Look up the streamline stretch I posted here several times. At no point in that swim did you actually hit a correct streamline.

              2 - Recovery. You are recovering your hands straight from where they finish to back out front. This is producing immense drag that is slowing you down every stroke. You need to hide at least the first arm under the chin and keep both arms as close to the body as possible.

              3 - First arm pull slipping. It's slipping through the water instead of really digging in, catching water and moving you forward. Look up EVF, early vertical forearm.

              4 - Slow second arm pull. Switch to the sprinter's sidestroke pull.

              5 - I don't like the kick. It looks like a hybrid between a breast stroke and scissor kick. Either one is fine but ride one horse, not two.

              6 - I see what the problem is with the double arm pull. You are racing your hands through the water. It has no catch. It's not moving water so that's why you aren't going anywhere. You are also too shallow. I have a double arm pull tutorial video posted here and on my YT channel with my same screen name.

              7 - The turn - I could time that with a calendar.

              You are swimming on both sides, and your timing isn't bad. Iron this stuff out and come back.

              /Coach Freddy

              Comment


              • #8
                dblackamdg mjkj0521 CoalTown fargo007
                Thank y'all for the input. It took me a minute to grasp the hybrid kick. I see what's wrong now. I will work on what was pointed out and post another video in time.

                Another question did come up with these replies: if I don't go back to a flat position (i.e. I stay on my side throughout the stroke) how does one hit a correct streamline? I tried just staying on the side and making myself as long as possible which brought down my time a little bit (shaved off about 30 seconds on the 450m). Should I stick with the torque or make an attempt to stay on my side? Or is it just a preference thing? I would rather do what is best for the long run and not focus on immediate results.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Good question.

                  The water doesn't care if you are rotated on axis, as long as you are in a correct streamline.

                  I would say whichever rotation profile gets you hitting a streamline the easiest (without generating other problems like a bad elbow or kicks breaching), is the one you should use.

                  Just watch out: With candidates who try to stay on their side religiously the entire time, there is in some, a tendency to recover the arm and elbow too high and get DQ'ed for shark finning.

                  I don't ever hear of that happening, but we stay aware of it because it's best not to get close to any of the red lines on the PST conduct standards.

                  Anyway, you need to fix the kick first before you can really see what's happening here in this part of the stroke.

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X