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  • College Disciplinary Issues

    Hi all,

    I am currently 24 and have been interested in earning a SEAL challenge contract for some time now. Sorry in advance for the long post, but I have scoured the internet and haven't seen a situation like mine, so any advice would really be appreciated.

    During my sophomore year of college (2013), I engaged in some poor behavior that included threatening another student over text, entering a fraternity house without permission, and possession of a lock-picking kit (I didn't use it for anything nefarious, not that it matters) - there are other instances as well, but these are the most serious. All of this occurred within a 4-6 week window, following a death in the family and me being ruled academically ineligible from our school's varsity wrestling team. I had started drinking a lot during this period to cope with the loss, as well as to deal with some negative emotions from no longer being able to compete on the wrestling team. The school charged me with violating their Code of Responsibility, and I took ownership of my poor decisions. The college's honor council instructed me to perform some community service and begin meeting with one of the on campus counselors.

    From that day forward I turned things around. I met with the counselor for several weeks and began volunteering with the local homeless population. The counselor provided positive feedback to the Dean of Students, and things seemed to return to normal. In 2016, I graduated with a B.S. in Physics. Over the last three years, I have experienced very positive career growth in the oil & gas industry - going from Field Engineer to Financial Analyst to Senior M&A/CorpDev Associate.

    I know the Navy is more concerned with actions rather than formal arrests/charges, but is it worth mentioning to a recruiter that I have never been arrested/charged with any crimes? For the first 18 years of my life I had been a well-behaved kid, and I haven't had any issues since. I definitely plan to self-admit all of the campus police reports and counseling records, and I am working out hard and continuing down a good path in my life. Would the Navy be willing to employ the "Whole person" concept in my situation, given that I would be an otherwise well-qualified applicant? Or am I hosed before I even get started?

    Thanks very much in advance for your time.



  • #2
    If you don’t mention it and they find out, and they will find out, you will not get in. But if you mention it, at least you have a chance. So yes, it’s worth mentioning.

    Comment


    • #3
      I'm not seeing an issue here. The Navy asks you about actual charges and convictions, not a list of misbehavior. We all make mistakes. There's nothing to report.
      Navy SEAL & SWCC Scout Team

      "The cost of freedom is always high, but Americans have always paid it. And one path we shall never choose, and that is the path of surrender, or submission."

      John F. Kennedy
      35th President of U.S. 1961-1963 (1917 - 1963)

      Comment


      • #4
        Mr. Williams, thank you for the advice.

        I have one follow up question if you don't mind answering - considering that these police reports and the counseling will definitely come up in a security clearance investigation (I will have to answer yes to Question 24 on the SF-86), would it be a good course of action to bring a copy of the reports and counseling records with me to the recruiting office, as well as a fingerprint background check showing that I have never been arrested/charged with anything?

        The campus police reports document the behavior I engaged in, and I gave statements taking responsibility for my actions. I don't want to volunteer more than I have to, but I don't want to risk any fraudulent enlistment issues by not self-admitting these reports.

        Am I overthinking this?

        Thanks again

        Comment


        • #5
          Yes, bring it all so the recruiter can evaluate them. Perhaps they add up to a minor misdemeanor, something that is waiverable. You won't know until the recruiter checks it out.
          Navy SEAL & SWCC Scout Team

          "The cost of freedom is always high, but Americans have always paid it. And one path we shall never choose, and that is the path of surrender, or submission."

          John F. Kennedy
          35th President of U.S. 1961-1963 (1917 - 1963)

          Comment

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