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  • Recovery

    Last week I kinda tripped and either pulled a muscle or have shin splints? I'm pretty sure I should rest a couple days on the running but am curious if should stop doing toe rises also? It doesn't bother me to do them though.

  • #2
    Re: Recovery

    It sounds like a minor injury. Use your personal discretion.

    I'd recommend you slow down and think before you post in the future.

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    • #3
      Re: Recovery

      Originally posted by IRunMan View Post
      I'd recommend you slow down and think before you post in the future.
      What run said x2.

      Don't be that guy. We already get enough of those guys as is.

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      • #4
        Re: Recovery

        I'm going to wait till Wednesday to go for a run. Do you guys think I should wait longer? If so what would be a normal recovery time for minor injuries like these? Has anybody experienced something like shin splints and ran past the pain?

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        • #5
          Re: Recovery

          Originally posted by RcCola View Post
          I'm going to wait till Wednesday to go for a run. Do you guys think I should wait longer? If so what would be a normal recovery time for minor injuries like these? Has anybody experienced something like shin splints and ran past the pain?
          "It sounds like a minor injury. Use your personal discretion.

          I'd recommend you slow down and think before you post in the future."

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          • #6
            Re: Recovery

            Thank you for the comparison..

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            • #7
              Re: Recovery

              If you give more details I might be able to help you. Right now, you should be doing the activity that feels most comfortable to you (walking instead of running for example) and if you feel any sharp pain, stop. See a doc if possible if the pain gets worse. Ice and compress. Common sense.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Recovery

                ice whatever part of your leg hurts.
                take an ibuprofen.
                stretch.

                Tripping will not cause you to get shin splints. Shin splints can be an annoying little pain that can lead to stress fractures.

                Have you increased your running drastically in the past few weeks?
                Is your running form terrible?
                Are you a seasoned athlete?

                You are very vague there RC COLA...try to post a bit more information because I am positive someone on the forum has experienced the same pain.

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                • #9
                  Re: Recovery

                  Well I am a few weeks into training again. Pushing out 17.5 miles a week. Also I'm jogging with 12 pound vest. So when I tripped I was not even a quarter mile into a three mile run and it had no affect till a couple days after. The pain came from the inside of my leg next to my shin. If that makes any since? I've just came back from a four mile run which seemed to be very disappointing although my time has decreased? The pain next to my shin has pretty much gone away just a little tense. I am pretty sure it was just shin splints? Because there was no swelling or bruising that I noticed. It was just odd though happening a couple days after tripping. I was paranoid that the muscle had separated from the bone lol Ice also seemed to make it hurt though but thanks for the tips guys

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                  • #10
                    Re: Recovery

                    Sounds like you just landed on your foot funny. I actually tripped a couple weeks ago running up some bleachers and landed hard on my right foot to catch myself. My lower shin was sore for a few days after, not because it struck anything, but because the muscles/ligaments exerted in catching myself were unaccustomed to that kind of force.

                    A good rule of thumb for these kinds of "unknown injuries" is that if the pain is sharp, don't use the thing in pain and see a doctor asap. If the pain is NOT sharp, continue to monitor the area and note any changes, significant or not. Sometimes, you can tell if the soreness will become a real injury by feel. Use common sense and when in doubt, ice, compress, elevate (I.C.E) and see a doctor.

                    Just for your future reference, shin splints are sharply painful and feel like needles are poking into your shins. Anything less probably isn't a shin splint. If you are worried about getting them, use the stretches provided my LCDR Cowan on the SEALSWCC youtube channel and try foam rolling them.

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                    • #11
                      Re: Recovery

                      Strange coincidence that we both hurt our right leg.

                      So shin splints usually occur when you dramatically increase the miles you run?

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                      • #12
                        Re: Recovery

                        Yeah, that's one way they can show up, but I've found over the years from running cross country that some people are way more prone to getting them than others. BUD/S may be the great equalizer in that, but I'd say there's usually a predisposition with the person in getting them, combined with ramping miles up too quickly. I have never had shin splints, but I have gone through a period where I increased my mileage by 5 miles every week, going from 15 to 50 (this is not a very smart idea, as a 10% increase in distance is ideally safe). People who have done sports like water polo or swimming have a higher tendency for getting them as well, as their lower appendages are not used to the pounding of running strides.

                        Aside from all of this, the main, across the board issue is ankle flexibility. Your ankle should be able to bend at about 20 degrees or so upon each stride, which requires well stretched calf muscles and ligaments. If your calfs and ankles are tight, the ankle is still going to try and get that 20 degree bend, but instead of getting it from a flexible ankle, it's going to put that strain on your shin bone. Do that enough and you'll get shin splints.

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                        • #13
                          Re: Recovery

                          Originally posted by tfranc View Post
                          Your ankle should be able to bend at about 20 degrees or so
                          When you say your ankle should bend 20 degrees or so do you mean bending down or up?

                          I sprained my ankle years ago and it seems like there is a big difference between each ankle with flexibility. My left calf seems to be more developed than my right? I want to think it is because of my ankles.. What do you think? My right leg is more dominate too.

                          But for some reason my left pectoral is more defined than my right? Either it's the missing rip or horrible form of push ups, pull ups and dips?

                          I'm funny looking...

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Recovery

                            Well, if you think about it mechanically from my description, there should be a 20 degree up bend. Think about when you push off for each stride, the angle of your ankle.

                            Your dominate right leg might just be from the fact that you're right footed (haha) and it's hard to say whether your calf is more developed due to genetics or because of what's called somatic inhibition. In other words, the fact that you use one ankle less/faultily because of a past injury. Without getting too much into detail, whenever injuries occur, we all have a tendency to favor the opposite side for obvious reasons and this can become habit. Eventually, this will produce a faulty "muscle memory" and our nervous system will then think that this is the correct way to use the injured area, when in fact it isn't, causing pain and faulty movement patterns. This is why it's crucial to actually take time to reestablish full range of motion and sometimes tediously rehabilitate injured areas. I, too, have sprained my ankles in the past. I think between each of them, 9 or 10 times at least (basketball). Assuming you haven't done a lot: If you perform the stretches from the SEALSWCC resource I talk about in my second post to you, you should start to be able to regain ankle flexibility. Simplified, the two main things to need to worry about in order to prevent shin splints is stretching your calfs nice and long and performing ankle mobility drills.

                            Superfluous muscle shape is usually a poor indicator of whether you are using proper technique or not. Everyone has a tendency to use their more dominate side, or have one side be naturally more defined, or larger than the other, but again, don't rely on that to tell you whether your form is good. Making a conscious effort to really focus on your movement pattern will develop good habits and in turn, keep you injury free and have better performance.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Recovery

                              Originally posted by tfranc View Post
                              Well, if you think about it mechanically from my description, there should be a 20 degree up bend. Think about when you push off for each stride, the angle of your ankle.

                              Your dominate right leg might just be from the fact that you're right footed (haha) and it's hard to say whether your calf is more developed due to genetics or because of what's called somatic inhibition. In other words, the fact that you use one ankle less/faultily because of a past injury. Without getting too much into detail, whenever injuries occur, we all have a tendency to favor the opposite side for obvious reasons and this can become habit. Eventually, this will produce a faulty "muscle memory" and our nervous system will then think that this is the correct way to use the injured area, when in fact it isn't, causing pain and faulty movement patterns. This is why it's crucial to actually take time to reestablish full range of motion and sometimes tediously rehabilitate injured areas. I, too, have sprained my ankles in the past. I think between each of them, 9 or 10 times at least (basketball). Assuming you haven't done a lot: If you perform the stretches from the SEALSWCC resource I talk about in my second post to you, you should start to be able to regain ankle flexibility. Simplified, the two main things to need to worry about in order to prevent shin splints is stretching your calfs nice and long and performing ankle mobility drills.

                              Superfluous muscle shape is usually a poor indicator of whether you are using proper technique or not. Everyone has a tendency to use their more dominate side, or have one side be naturally more defined, or larger than the other, but again, don't rely on that to tell you whether your form is good. Making a conscious effort to really focus on your movement pattern will develop good habits and in turn, keep you injury free and have better performance.
                              Ugh I feel smarter now. Thanks

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