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WILKS for log PT

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  • WILKS for log PT

    Just had my last day as a Physical Therapy Rehab Tech, aka PT Aide, before shipping on the 4th. My boss and ran through a couple important exercises to do with a band to prepare for log PT. The most important that stood out, which most have never heard, are wilks.
    Take a resistance band, about 10in in diameter, tied in a circle, and place it around your wrists. Start with elbows bent at 90 degrees, and perform a slight external rotation of the shoulders on the band, while doing this, raise both arms above head, and get elbows straight at the top. A good way to do this is running your arms up a wall. Hold for 5 seconds at the top. Perform 20 reps for 2 sets. You can incorporate this into your push/sit/pull days, or your strengthening. This benefits scap stabilization and the smaller muscles in the shoulder that normally wouldn't be touched during standard weight training. Goodluck, and hit me with any questions.
    -Blackwood

  • #2
    If you get a chance, would you mind posting a video?

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    • #3
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fvAKsnr2e_I
      This video shows an example, except I was taught both arms at once. So instead of one arm at a time going halfway up, use both arms and try to get to the top with arms completely above head at end range. dcthomas13

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      • #4
        A correctly performed barbell overhead press does the same thing, except you'll get much stronger doing it, because you can incrementally increase weight on a barbell.

        Not knocking this at all, just as a point of debate.

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        • #5
          tfranc My argument would be using a barbell is similar, but I wouldn't say that using a barbell hits your external rotators(teres/supraspinatus) as well as this would.

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          • #6
            But if the function of the scapular musculature is stabilazation of the shoulder girdle when the arms are in an overhead position, and that stabilazation occurs when the scapula are externally rotated/rotated upward, then strengthening the scapula in the overhead position seems like the thing you'd want to do, you know?

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            • #7
              tfranc I agree with you, strengthening the scap in the overhead position is important, especially for this type of program dealing with logs overhead. Barbell training overhead is in the PTG, and is a great exercise to strengthen said muscles. Although, this is just an additive to the overhead strengthening workouts that would do nothing but benefit.

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              • #8
                When I tore my serratus anterior last winter and subsequently sprained a shoulder ligament, this was one of the main exercises my PT prescribed me.

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