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Is NSW accepting mild color blind candidates?

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  • Is NSW accepting mild color blind candidates?

    I was watching one of Stew Smith and Jeff Nichol's video and in it they found a document that said color vision is wavier able for most of SOCOM but not EOD. I researched further into the document and read color vision and dept perception is wavier able. Is this true, can people get waivers now for NSW? Thank you for any and every response.

  • #2
    I mean unless I’m missing something you answered your own question boss. You said it is waiverable. From what Jeff and stew said as well try to practice figuring out how to pass the vision test. Work on the colors you can’t decipher and see if there is something you can remember you get it right.

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    • #3
      In the same boat. Waivers are available although I have no idea what the threshold is for getting one. You need 10/14 to pass the PIP. No idea how much lower you can score and still get a waiver. Unfortunately since this is a such a new change nobody seems to know what failing score would still be waiverable. And according to MANMED, PIP is the only test being offered, despite MANMED alluding to a secondary test. FALANT is out. If you get any answers, post them.

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      • #4
        You have to have perfect vision

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        • jlhota
          jlhota commented
          Editing a comment
          Well this just isn't true at all.

      • #5
        It is, as a general rule of thumb. SEAL has the strictest vision requirements in our military! Vision has to be able too be corrected to perfect with no color blindness.

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        • jlhota
          jlhota commented
          Editing a comment
          Exactly. Vision has to be correctable, thus not perfect. On top of that Pilots absolutely have more stringent vision reqs, they require depth perception while SEAL contracts do not.

      • #6
        Change 164 to the MANMED P-117 came out on May 22. It clarified color vision and depth perception standards. Depth perception must meet this standard:

        (d) Depth Perception. Only stereopsis is tested. Must pass any one of the following three tests:
        (1) AFVT: at least A – D with no misses.
        (2) Circle Stereogram (See the ARWG for validated and accepted tests): 40 arc second circles.
        (3) Stereopter (See the ARWG for validated and accepted tests): 8 of 8 correct on the first trial or, if any are missed, 16 of 16 correct on the combined second and third trials.

        Adequate color vision is demonstrated by:

        (1) Correctly identifying at least 10 out of 14 Pseudo-isochromatic Plates (PIP).

        (2) The Farnsworth Lantern (FALANT) or OPTEC 900 will only be authorized for commissioning candidates who were previously accepted into a program leading to a commission utilizing the FALANT/OPTEC 900 to demonstrate adequate color vision. A passing FALANT/OPTEC 900 score is obtained by correctly identifying 9 out of 9 presentations on the first test series. If any incorrect identifications are made, a second consecutive series of 18 presentations is administered. On the second series, a passing score is obtained by correctly identifying 16, 17, or 18 presentations.

        Waiver requests for color vision deficiency will not be considered for EOD personnel or candidates. Other special operations communities will consider waivers. Waiver requests must include a statement from the member's supervisor stating that the member is able to perform his job accurately and without difficulty, and provide evidence that primary and secondary colors can be discerned.

        That's the letter of the policy folks. It should be noted that if you do not meet the standards, do not expect a waiver to be approved. Exceptions to policy (such as age) and waivers are not easy to get, but they are possible. Work with your recruiter, and don't listen to videos on the Internet from non-official sources, no matter how credible they may seem. Good luck.
        Navy SEAL & SWCC Scout Team

        "The cost of freedom is always high, but Americans have always paid it. And one path we shall never choose, and that is the path of surrender, or submission."

        John F. Kennedy
        35th President of U.S. 1961-1963 (1917 - 1963)

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        • GWsophomore
          GWsophomore commented
          Editing a comment
          Scott - I still have some questions. In regards to FALANT, it reads that it is no longer administered at MEPS or RTC unless one was already accepted before it was phased out. Am I mistaken?

          You said, "If you do not meet the standard, do not expect a waiver to be approved." I'm confused because aren't waivers only processed because a candidate did not meet the standard? If someone scores 10/14 on the PIP they meet the standard, if they get 9 or less, I assume they would then apply for a waiver. It clearly says that waiver requests require evidence that primary colors can be discerned. Is that demonstrated by another test at a private doctor that one brings to MEPS? If one cannot score 10/14 on the PIP, what do they need to do to secure a waiver? What evidence of discerning primary and secondary colors would be necessary?

          Thanks,

          Sam

      • #7
        I just want to give a quick thanks to everyone who has replied in the thread so far for their answers, and also letting me know there are other people on the same boat that i'm in.

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        • #8
          GWsophomore, as I said, do not EXPECT them to be approved. You may apply of course, but the odds are still against you. Just setting expectations. Of course there is always a chance you could get the waiver approved, I just don't want anyone thinking they've found the golden loophole and all their problems are solved. As far as further testing, that's a question for MEPS.
          Navy SEAL & SWCC Scout Team

          "The cost of freedom is always high, but Americans have always paid it. And one path we shall never choose, and that is the path of surrender, or submission."

          John F. Kennedy
          35th President of U.S. 1961-1963 (1917 - 1963)

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