Announcement

Collapse

Manual of the Medical Department

Questions about medical procedures?
Go to http://www.med.navy.mil/directives/P...lications.aspx, scroll down to MANMED Change 126 (pages 51-112) and download the document. The pertinent section is Article 15-105 Naval Special Warfare and Special Operations.
See more
See less

Waiver Issue

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Waiver Issue

    I believe I have a pretty unique situation and was looking to get some accurate and detailed information, preferably by a moderator/ administrator. I'd be truly grateful for any and all information and help provided.

    About a year ago, my recruiter and I sent off my medical background to MEPS. I had a history of anxiety listed on there which I will go into detail on below. My recruiter told me I would be PDQ initially, but that the doctors at MEPS would send me to see an outside practitioner to get evaluated, and that I would most likely get a waiver since I was a very solid candidate. I was PDQ and my papers were sent directly out for a waiver where it was denied. I never got to see n outside doctor for evaluation, nor was I allowed to make my case for the waiver, as my recruiter had told me I would. I felt as though my case was not well presented based on what I had expected to happened from what I was told by the recruiter. My questions are:

    -Is it possible to resend my information to MEPS to retry for a waiver (I've seen sources that say you can after 6 months but I don't if that accurate)

    -Would going to see an outside practitioner (proving I have no anxiety) before sending my medical history to MEPS be useful? Would it help the opinion of the party deciding on my waiver?

    -Would I be allowed to present my case, similarly to how I have below, to the NCO who is deciding on my waiver?

    -I would also just appreciate your opinion on my case below and how it will be interpreted by MEPS and the NCO. I have a BS degree in biology and am currently in the process of applying to medical school.

    About 4 years ago, during finals week of college I went to see a psychologist to get tested for ADHD! Essentially the test was little more than a survey asking about incorporating questions such as "in the past 2 weeks have you felt: stressed/anxious/tired/unable to concentrate/ etc.?" I was honest with the questions hoping to get an accurate diagnosis, and it being finals week, I stated I had been stressed/ anxious, as I feel any normal college student would during finals. I was given a diagnosis of anxiety/depression, (no diagnosis at all for ADHD??) and given a prescription for an antidepressant. I took the medication only once, and woke up in the night with violent symptoms (EXTREME vertigo/dizziness, vomiting, diarrhea, tachycardia, and hot flashes). Ironically, the medication given to me to help with anxiety induced a mild panic attack (I thought I might be dying). I'd NEVER had a panic attack before, and the unknown factor of what was happening caused me to have anxiety for about a month. I never took the medication again, but did see a psychologist for about a month at my parent's behest (God bless them). I feel at this point it's important to state that I NEVER had any signs/symptoms/thoughts of anxiety my entire life before taking the medication, and never experienced any symptoms after. In fact, quite the opposite, as I could find dozens of people (some anxiety sufferers) willing to affirm that I did not, and still do not share any qualities with a person suffering from anxiety. I truly believe that learning to deal with the instances of panic, and how to categorized my emotions, greatly strengthened my mental fortitude and allows me to better handle stressful situations! Public speaking was stressful to me before(in a normal healthy way), but now it's no problem because I know how to handle the mental aspect, and how my body will react to stressors.

    I personally believe that if my case is looked at with the details provided and an outside opinion, there's nothing "red flag" about me that should prevent or hinder my success in the Navy. This is what I want to do with my life. I can't eat, sleep, or walk without thinking about it. I just want my chance. Thank you to those who took the time to read, and offer your insights and opinions. I appreciate it more than you know.

  • #2
    I don't have any experience with anxiety waivers, but I was told similar with my medical waivers. It took me almost two years and counting, but my new recruiter has given me a different story. He said that in cases where waivers were previously denied, we need to go to an outside practitioner and bring in their results. Then, those papers can be put at the end of our packets as additional information and resubmitted for a second evaluation. He says it doesn't always work, but it's worth a shot.
    Currently in year six of hurry up and wait.

    Comment


    • #3
      I would go to an outside practitioner and that can only help your situation. How long ago were you prescribed this medicine? and it was only for one month correct? I would DM Scott Williams on here, he is very helpful. I would think anxiety waivers are very hard to get but if you only had it for one month and have outside source saying you're fine; I think you'd be fine. Good luck!

      Comment


      • #4
        It was 4-5 years ago I was prescribed the medication, and only took one pill. I did talk to a counselor for a month. I appreciate the advice though! I'll try to contact him ASAP!

        Comment

        Working...
        X