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  • Helpful Tips

    I am an endurance athlete and climber and over the years I have learned a great deal about how to stay in the game. The trick to staying in the game is to not listen to the voices in your head telling you all the really good reasons you do not need to continue on course .... haven't heard the voices yet? That means that you haven't spent any time way, way outside your comfort zone. Trust me, when you wander far outside your comfort zone they will be there .... I have been at this stuff for years and they never go away, EVER.

    The first step to prepare for this level of mental toughness is to get outside your comfort zone ... there are many ways to do this. One of my favorite is to suggest heading over to high school track at night and spend the entire night walking around the track {switch diection every few hours**. This has many benefits, first off you are just walking, albeit for a very long time and you won't beat yourself up doing this, as the hours go by and it is middle of the night you will be assualted by the voices inside your head, they will throw all sorts of stuff at you. Giving you a million reasons to quit, the question is will you? I guarentee you will learn so much about yourself by doing this and understand some of the mental challenges you will face when you enter the pipeline

    Hope this helps

  • #2
    Re: Helpful Tips

    I will have to try this out once it begins to warm up here. (~20 degrees F at night) I'm actually looking forward to this challenge, as it is so simple but definitely will not be easy.

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    • #3
      Re: Helpful Tips

      Haha. I always get those voices, especially during running. I never do quit and can honestly say I've never quit a race or even taken it easy on myself ever. One race in particular nothing was going my way... had a ****** mile split, and tried to push hard to get to where I wanted to be. I got so tired (to the point where I was puking), but kept on going, not super fast, but not a slow pace either. And there was a huge hill right before the end of the finishline, which ****** me off a lot... lol but I got through it, however my time kinda sucked. It was only a 19:05 or something.

      But yeah those voices can get to you, and I always question why I signed up for this sport during it, but after it its the greatest feeling ever. I can't explain it its just awesome. But the feeling is so good I always end up going back and doing many more races. lol

      Gordon

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      • #4
        Re: Helpful Tips

        Give your mind a break!

        When I was first in DEP, all I could think about was the SEALs. All I ever wanted to talk about was the SEALs, and other military related things. Not only was it driving my friends and family insane, but it was driving myself insane to the point where I'm using up all of my adreneline and excitement before I even got to Great Lakes. What I've learned is that you don't need to be always thinking about what's going to happen during training 24/7. It will drive you crazy.

        One thing I experimented with is I would take a few hours out of the day and just occupy my mind with other activities. Go to starbucks and have coffee with someone, or just read a book. Turn on ESPN and see what's going on in the sports world. Go out for the night and just hangout with some buddies. Have a beer (of course if you're 21 or older), and just talk about whatever, but not military unless they ask you how it's going. If you're working for another job while in DEP, obviously use that job and focus on your work. Don't be working while only thinking about the military. Trust me, this concept works.

        It may seem like a good idea to be worrying about what training will be like, and about how much stronger you want to get before shipping out. In many ways, yes, to a certain degree, you want to be thinking about those kinds of things almost daily. But it's not good for your health if it's all you think about every hour of every day.
        "When you come to the end of your rope, tie a knot and hang on."-- Franklin D. Roosevelt

        "Our greatest glory is not in never failing, but in rising up every time we fail" -- Ralph Waldo Emerson

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        • #5
          Re: Helpful Tips

          When they talk about goal setting, they mean in small increments (i.e. I'm going to get through this pt session and make it to breakfast. After breakfast, you say to yourself I'm going to make it to lunch, and so on.) Now most guys will probably ask, "Why make more goals for yourself, and try to just make it through only one portion of the day. You should be focused on making it through the entire 6 months." Yes, your ultimate goal is to make it through the entire 6 months necessary to graduate and move on to SQT. But if all you think about is the big picture, and all of the sudden, here comes an evolution that you didn't anticipate, it will make it that much more difficult to complete. Look at it this way. If you say to yourself, "I'm going to make it to lunch." You make it to lunch, and you think "Hey, I'm still here. Ok lets make it to dinner." More likely than not, that same thought will hit you almost everytime, "Hey, I'm still here." Before you know it, the day will be over, and you can go shower off, and go to sleep, and do it all over again.

          Of course, to me at least, waking up is the hardest part of the day. But that's a different subject.
          "When you come to the end of your rope, tie a knot and hang on."-- Franklin D. Roosevelt

          "Our greatest glory is not in never failing, but in rising up every time we fail" -- Ralph Waldo Emerson

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