Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Fear of Heights

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Fear of Heights

    Guys, growing up I had a fear of heights, but it is slowly going away. Have any of y'all had this problem, and if so how did you get over it. Like I said mine has been getting much better, and I am planning on skydiving in about a month, but any pointers or suggestions would be great. Went to the top of the Capitol Building today, which I think is about 200 ft up, and loved it, so I think the situation continues to improve. EASY DAY!
    "Sure I am this day we are masters of our fate, that the task which has been set before us is not above our strength; that its pangs and toils are not beyond our endurance. As long as we have faith in our own cause and an unconquerable will to win, victory will not be denied us."

    -Winston Churchill-

    EASY DAY
    -John Bailey-

  • #2
    Re: Fear of Heights

    Hey UNC Dude, you can take confidence with three things. First, it is possible to extinguish anxiety responses through training and repetitive drilling. What you describe is a technique termed "successive approximation" and works well. It involves taking small steps and building up to (previously) high anxiety-provoking situations, but maintaining calm, control and/or the outcome of success at each stage, or what is called "desensitization." It is actually a very powerful set of behavioral modification techniques. The human being can be trained to replace the anxiety response with calm, or even an activation response (something like an athlete's response).

    Second, your response to situations will be affected by context, and you can think about the effect of being surrounded by teammates or being in a crisis situation. You might not jump out of a plane on your own, but when your buddies are jumping out in front of you and waiting to jump out behind you, there is an increased probability that you are going to jump too. Case and point, consider the "Stairway to Heaven" or the tower on the SEAL O-course. A guy in BUD/S can expect to be trained to climb 'em, he will be drilled on 'em, and he will do it all in a series of situations with his team (read Couch's accounts of the O course in "Warrior Elite").

    A third factor that might also help is monitoring your own cognition, meanining what you're focusing on and thinking about during the anxiety provoking situations. Most of the time, anxiety is fed by a perception of the situation as lethal and the resultant conclusion "I'm gonna die!" It is possible to substitute and drill yourself on using a different set of perceptions and thoughts. For example, when it comes to height, rather than focusing on altitude, focusing on one step, or other unit of ascension (e.g. 100 feet or 1,000 meters) at a time until final altitude is reached. For example, if you've ever had to climb a fire tower or tall ladder to paint a house, it's about focusing on just the next step to get higher up on that tower or ladder - one step at a time. Also, rather than perceiving the situation as dangerous, rationally remember that others have accomplished the same task before you, or perhaps that the situation is not beyond your training or control. In the examples I cited, you could remember that many guys before you have gone up and down that fire tower on a daily basis with no problems and did their jobs at the top - meaning it is possible, has been done many times before, and YOU can do it too! It is also possible to drill to the point where you're not thinking much at all, but have an automatic response trained in you ('habituated") instead. For example, a buddy of mine who is a commercial airline pilot is mercilessly drilled on protocols for responding to crisis situations. When an engine falls off the plane, he has an automatic response that follows a very specific protocol and set of steps -- not much room left for plugging in the lava lamp and pondering all the fearsome things that could happen with only one engine left.

    Any or all of these strategies will work for you, and it sounds like you're already engaged in putting them to productive use for yourself! Keep up the program!

    Check out this Men's Health article for some additional examples:
    http://www.menshealth.com/men/best-l...20000012281eac
    Tom Delaney
    St. Paul, Minnesota, USA

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Fear of Heights

      Thanks Delaney. Great response, I appreciate all the advice and the encouragement! I'll update you on how the November Skydiving goes, hopefully, part of the problems is financial. But I'm ready to give it a shot! HOOYAH!
      "Sure I am this day we are masters of our fate, that the task which has been set before us is not above our strength; that its pangs and toils are not beyond our endurance. As long as we have faith in our own cause and an unconquerable will to win, victory will not be denied us."

      -Winston Churchill-

      EASY DAY
      -John Bailey-

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Fear of Heights

        By the way, fantastic article. I really want to go run, swim, and workout right now. Too bad I'm stuck in the office.

        After work though! HOOYAH!
        "Sure I am this day we are masters of our fate, that the task which has been set before us is not above our strength; that its pangs and toils are not beyond our endurance. As long as we have faith in our own cause and an unconquerable will to win, victory will not be denied us."

        -Winston Churchill-

        EASY DAY
        -John Bailey-

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Fear of Heights

          Originally posted by UNCDUDE33 View Post
          By the way, fantastic article. I really want to go run, swim, and workout right now. Too bad I'm stuck in the office.

          After work though! HOOYAH!
          I feel your pain! Working on sneaking out for a "liquid lunch" myself -- as in 1,000 yards of pool water!!
          Tom Delaney
          St. Paul, Minnesota, USA

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Fear of Heights

            I had a huge fear of heights as well. I was afraid of roller coasters, looking out of the window from high buildings, and even had nightmares of falling from skyscrapers. Hell, sometimes I get that "stomach in throat" feeling from jumping off of high structures in video games.

            I did what you plan to do and went skydiving a couple of months ago. It was the scariest thing I've ever done. The tension mounts as you look out the window and see the ground get smaller and smaller as you climb in altitude. I remember looking out the window and saying "Wow, we're pretty high up," only to have the guy next to me say that we have another 10,000 ft to go.

            When you shuffle on over to the door and look down and mentally panic and want to back out of doing it, there's nothing left to do but just go for it and jump. You just do it and get it over with and after it's all over, you realize it was probably one of the best rushes you have ever felt in your life.


            Good luck and have fun!


            -Barall

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Fear of Heights

              Awesome man. Glad to hear it helped you! I can't wait! I just need to save up some money, which is tough when you are working on an intern's salary.
              "Sure I am this day we are masters of our fate, that the task which has been set before us is not above our strength; that its pangs and toils are not beyond our endurance. As long as we have faith in our own cause and an unconquerable will to win, victory will not be denied us."

              -Winston Churchill-

              EASY DAY
              -John Bailey-

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Fear of Heights

                I have a small issue of "vertigo." I love to fly. Going up a ladder is nothing. But when I'm going up tall buildings, and being close to railings and walls at a certain height makes me very shaky. I don't freeze, but most of the time, I feel like I'm about to. If I'm not tied in, it usually takes me a little longer to move from point A to point B at extreme heights. Any advise?
                "When you come to the end of your rope, tie a knot and hang on."-- Franklin D. Roosevelt

                "Our greatest glory is not in never failing, but in rising up every time we fail" -- Ralph Waldo Emerson

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Fear of Heights

                  Originally posted by bcowen09 View Post
                  I have a small issue of "vertigo." I love to fly. Going up a ladder is nothing. But when I'm going up tall buildings, and being close to railings and walls at a certain height makes me very shaky. I don't freeze, but most of the time, I feel like I'm about to. If I'm not tied in, it usually takes me a little longer to move from point A to point B at extreme heights. Any advise?
                  I was scared of heights and roller coasters and one day I went to an amusement park with my buddy, and we went on the first ride there which was one of the biggest, and I was freaked out, and really did not want to go, but I did.... I guess I didn't want to let him down, but now I LOVE roller coasters. lol

                  Gordon

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Fear of Heights

                    Originally posted by Gordon_075 View Post
                    I was scared of heights and roller coasters and one day I went to an amusement park with my buddy, and we went on the first ride there which was one of the biggest, and I was freaked out, and really did not want to go, but I did.... I guess I didn't want to let him down, but now I LOVE roller coasters. lol

                    Gordon
                    The problem is though that I've repeatidly gone up tall buildings, even sometimes at free will, and I still have a pretty noticable phobia.
                    "When you come to the end of your rope, tie a knot and hang on."-- Franklin D. Roosevelt

                    "Our greatest glory is not in never failing, but in rising up every time we fail" -- Ralph Waldo Emerson

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X