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Gaining More Life Experience Before Enlisting

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  • #16
    Re: Gaining More Life Experience Before Enlisting

    Just be true to yourself, only you know what you need to do. Don't be afraid of failing buds, be more bummed that you won't be there to watch the backs of your brothers. You would be a sailor first and a SEAL second, remember that, you want to join the Navy. Have you ever seen Fight Club? You know the scene where Pitt pours Lye on Norton's hand? The whole "know that one day you're going to die" thing. You need to be at peace with your choices in life, otherwise you'll always second guess yourself and then you go running for that bell.

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    • #17
      Re: Gaining More Life Experience Before Enlisting

      I recognize that I use the term "experience" loosely. In a way, that's almost because I don't know what it is, yet I feel like I need it. I don't think it's going to magically come to me one day, but I feel like I need to go out and get a little bit of it before trying something as rigorous as a career in Special Warfare. And yeah, it's a great thing we've got time on our side. And, I'll do my best not to waste my time.

      Originally posted by D Man
      Ive wanted to be a SEAL since I was 10. Im 17 now and each day my motivation gets stronger. If you go to BUD/s dont let someone with a microphone get you to quit. It's going to suck but if you want the trident you will suck it up and keep pushing.
      Thanks, but not really too relevant.

      Originally posted by Solid
      Just be true to yourself, only you know what you need to do. Don't be afraid of failing buds, be more bummed that you won't be there to watch the backs of your brothers. You would be a sailor first and a SEAL second, remember that, you want to join the Navy. Have you ever seen Fight Club? You know the scene where Pitt pours Lye on Norton's hand? The whole "know that one day you're going to die" thing. You need to be at peace with your choices in life, otherwise you'll always second guess yourself and then you go running for that bell.
      I always liked Fight Club for its interesting philosophical nuances. Never thought it could be applied to my own life, but I guess that's true.

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      • #18
        Re: Gaining More Life Experience Before Enlisting

        Originally posted by noleman5509 View Post
        I will respectfully disagree with tfranc for several reasons on this topic. College is a time where you go in order to specialize in a certain field, and basically become "qualified," to do that job by society's standards. Despite this, it is also a time where you figure out what you like and what you don't like. You will meet all kinds of different people, take classes on all kinds of different topics, work different jobs, see different areas, and learn things about yourself and others. For example, I was pursuing a totally different path before I came to know about the SEAL pipeline. I never even knew I wanted to join the SEAL community until I was a junior. At that point I was working as an undergraduate researcher in an Organic Synthesis lab working on my own project. Around spring break, my grandmother sent me a book about Navy SEALs in the mail; I opened it not expecting to make a life decision based on what I read but I did. It was a snowball effect from there. I started reading and researching about the community, desperately trying to find every bit information that I could. Once I was interested in this path, I was dead sure that I wasn't going to be working in a research lab for the next two decades of my life; I was going to put every ounce of energy and effort into reaching the goal of making it to the teams.

        I read the Heart and the Fist (great read by the way). I also read Dam* Few by Rourke Denver, and in his book he didn't know what he wanted to do until near the end of his college career while playing lacrosse at Syracuse University. He eventually went on to be responsible for the training of many Navy SEALs over the course of his career.

        The point of me telling you all of this I guess is that you have plenty of time down the road if you want to pursue a career as a SEAL now, or later. If you're having reservations now, then maybe you should get out in the world and see if you can't find anything else that sparks your interest, while also gaining life experience along the way. Some of the things you do may actually solidify your desire to pursue that path. Some of the things you do may help you down the road if/when you ever arrive in Coronado for training. College is definitely a place where you'll get the chance to try different paths. I worked a few jobs during college that I HATED, one of them being roofing in the hot South Florida sun. Working that job was grueling, don't get me wrong. But it taught me what it was like to have to work your tail off for little return, and in turn humbled me. My days were hot, I worked with people that spoke very little English, and I had no prior experience. But I learned to adapt quickly. I learned some spanish, I worked as hard as my body would let me and I earned the respect of those around me.

        Like it's been said, it's ultimately up to you. But it definitely won't be a bad decision if you decide to go get your education first. There's always the ROTC route too if you decide to do so. Hope my post gave you a little perspective and you reach your goal whether it's now or 8 years from now.

        GL

        I agree with a lot of the things you're saying and perhaps my experience with college was just simply different due to the fact that I didn't quite have the luxury of approaching it the way you did. However, I will say that while college does expose you to different things, it's mostly theoretical. Imagine a guy who enlists at 18, sees the world, experiences some real things, finds out who he is and THEN goes to school. That man is a much more focused man. Sure, there are opportunities to try this and do that, but it's the safety net that makes it a different game. It's hard to go, "Ok, hm, I guess I can do this for the next 45 years" when you've got no life experience. You learn what to look for and gain a much maturer and less theoretical perspective going to school later on in your life. This is where my point comes in and touches a little on what you've already said. I would argue that what you like and what you don't like isn't because of the thing you are trying out, it's because of who you are as a person and that character comes out way more when, like you say, you're working a ****** 9-5 or 11pm to 7am job. It really makes you think hard about choosing a career path when you get off work and you're tired and your job kinda sucks and you've got bills to pay or else you'll be homeless and guess what? You've got to do it all again tomorrow and the next day and the next day and the next, rather than trying a 3 unit class that takes a 2 week trip to Costa Rica to study botany and you're taking it to see if you want to become a biologist.

        I'm also going to say that viewing the SEAL opportunity like it will be there later on down the road is a mistake. As soon as you turn 18, the window begins to close. You can go to school when you're 90. You can't go to BUD/S when you're 29. And guess what gents? (especially you 18 or 19 year old's) Believe it or not, 29 is just around the corner. You don't need to rush, you should take your time and train right, but there needs to be a sense of urgency in your belly about this and a drive to pursue.

        I supposed that college can be used as a buffer between a child's life and real life, a way to ease into adulthood, taking a 3 month job over the summer, working part time at a DQ or something during the school year. With that sense of urgency in mind about the SEAL opportunity, though, it's a bit more risky. The bottom line is that you have no idea where you'll be in 4 years. Noleman, you describe this perfectly in having your path change practically overnight all because of a book your grandma sent you (a grandma with good taste in books I might add, haha). So take the opportunities you hold in your heart (sorry for being cheesy again) and run as fast as you can with them. The window is closing. Jump through it before you're too old and far down the line. Most of you younger guys don't really know what this means yet. I'm just beginning to learn. Life can sweep you off your feet as quick as she pleases, right under your nose sometimes, as much as you are in control of your own. I guarantee that every single older guy on here has had to either sacrifice something, or many things close to them to attempt this path, and/or they wish they were able to start sooner. Some of them have kids and wives. Now that's a tough road to hoe and they're lucky to have such supportive partners. That's harder than living on your own for a while, training with few responsibilities and going to BUD/S. Just keep all this stuff in mind when making a decision. You should be thinking 10, 15, 20+ years down the line and where you'd like to be... all easier done, I might add, when you've had some life experience.

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        • #19
          Re: Gaining More Life Experience Before Enlisting

          Originally posted by Vicieux View Post
          This is spot on to what I'm going through. However, I felt mentally ready at 18, some people are just born/raised with the traits to make it through challenges like its a matter of life and death. I was fortunate enough for my father to be in the spec ops community, so growing up, it wasn't good enough unless it was perfect; it didn't matter how **** hard I tried, maximum effort was just always expected reguardless.
          Oh interesting, wow what a resource in your father. For me it was my Lt. Col step father and my problem with authority haha. Didn't go over so well...

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