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  • Mental Weakness

    My name is Matt and i have been working out nonstop for the past 10 months. I have always been an athletic kid. Somedays when i go to the gym i really do not want to. I always end up going even though i don't want too but i was wondering if im mentally weak for not wanting to go to the gym

  • #2
    Re: Mental Weakness

    This happens to me too, as long as you don't quit and go and do your best then in my opinion you are not mentally weak because you understand that even though you are unmotivated, tired or just laxy you understand that this is what needs to be done in order to be the man you want to be.

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    • #3
      Re: Mental Weakness

      Thanks that helps! does anyone else have any other opinions about this topic or any other problems like this

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      • #4
        Re: Mental Weakness

        You're not mentally weak for not wanting to go to the gym; there's a difference between not being gung ho about working out and being mentally weak. If you don't want to go and then you do, that's more of a sign of mental drive than anything else.

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        • #5
          Re: Mental Weakness

          Sounds like a motivation problem to me. I commend your commitment, but also consider adding variety or switching up your workouts a little. Are you doing the same routine every time? Is there a way to do the same exercises ina different order? With new twists? There is some research to suggest that switching up your workouts actually improves muscle development. Are you working out with a motivating partner or group of like-minded PT fanatics? Hate to say it, but sometimes the key to motivation for me is NEW GEAR! Get yourself a t-shirt that ONLY looks good when you're PT'ing hard!

          P.S. One more thing to consider, make sure you have set explicit written goals for yourself, are tracking your progress, and giving yourself positive recognition and reward for reaching your goals when it happens.
          Tom Delaney
          St. Paul, Minnesota, USA

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          • #6
            Re: Mental Weakness

            I usually switch up my workouts every 3-4 week but i got screwed up over christmas break so i think i've been doing my workout a lot longer than i should have like 6 weeks but i just changed it today. i don't have a partner just because of my lifestyle its kinda hard to find somebody like me so i always workout alone. i workout 7 days a week twice on somedays. I seem to be setting my goals to high or i'm just not working hard enough or something cause i seem to fall short on some of them like my bench was 225 in november and i wanted it to be 260 by the end of the school year but i don't think thats happening cause i think I'm at like 235- 240 now. (By the way I'm going to college before joining so i have a lot of time to get BUD/s ready but right now Im just trying to get a little bigger cause I'm 6'0 and weigh 157 so i need to put some pounds on me before i start working on my endurance muscle. also I am a boxer so i already have a lot of fast twitch muscle which really doesn't get you big so thats why i've been focusing on weight training.) I have some days when I am really tired and don't want to workout but i know i would break a promise if i didn't go and i just wanted to see if I'm the only one who goes through this.

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            • #7
              Re: Mental Weakness

              I have this problem all the time! It sucks. I am always like eh, I'm not feeling it today. I need to track my progress and write down my goals though like Delaney said. Maybe I need to try making smaller goals because right now I have a long ways to go until I am ready for the PST let alone BUD/S. My max pushups and situps could double, and I have no idea how many pull ups I can do in a row. Right now I am trying to get the proper Sidestroke technique down as well. I think the only thing I am solid at is running. Which makes sense since I ran cross country in High School...

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              • #8
                Re: Mental Weakness

                Let me put it to you this way man. I was in the program before. For over a year, I trained my *** off every day to be able to perform once I ship out to Great Lakes. But before I got there, there were recent events that occured with my family that I ignored, but I shouldn't have. My father passed away shortly before I shipped, and I thought I would be a man by neglecting what happened, and act like it never happened. But what happened instead was when I reported to training, those feelings of guilt, sorrow, and loss caught up with me. The Navy decided to let me go because it wasn't the time for me to be in training. Even though I knew I could return, I felt like it was the end of the world for me because all the work I did was for nothing. What I needed to remember was that it wasn't my fault, and there was nothing to be ashamed of. Today, I feel more refreshed and stronger mentally than ever.

                My point is simply that it doesn't matter who you are, at one point or another, you're gonna have those feelings of weakness, or that feeling "I don't feel like going to the gym today." Everyone does. What makes us different from society is that when we do have those feelings or thoughts, we counter-act them and decide to pull through. My mentor told me that it's not a common thing where someone who gets dropped from training because of something that happened to them would come back and would wanna do it again. My family said it was because of faith. Other people said it was luck. For me, I believe it was because of my "NEVER GIVE UP" attitude. And I believe that you have that attitude too man. Good luck to ya man! NEVER GIVE UP, NEVER BACK DOWN!!!
                "When you come to the end of your rope, tie a knot and hang on."-- Franklin D. Roosevelt

                "Our greatest glory is not in never failing, but in rising up every time we fail" -- Ralph Waldo Emerson

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                • #9
                  Re: Mental Weakness

                  Well for me its just i would feel horrible because i technically "quit" if you don't workout when your supposed too. Its just like a huge feeling of let down if don't and if decide to "quit" while training for BUD/s then what's going to stop me from quitting in BUD/s.

                  Also a friend of mine said that self motivation is the most important motivation because when your freezing your butt off and you want to quit you don't have your dad there or your friend there motivating you to stay. I have been working out for close to a year straight by myself to build a strong foundation for BUD/s and to keep myself healthy, and even though its not like BUD/s training i still have learned a lot about myself about how to keep myself motivated and other little things that can really help someone grow as a person mentally because you know what to do when your feeling discouraged or broke down so when you get to BUD/s and they beat you down in the first day you are familiar with how counter those feelings and talk yourself through training. I don't think Im the strongest mentally cause im a tadpole just like everyone else and i would be arrogant if i did. i just really hate failing and the feeling of letting myself down or more importantly letting someone else down.

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                  • #10
                    Re: Mental Weakness

                    Originally posted by mmarino View Post
                    Well for me its just i would feel horrible because i technically "quit" if you don't workout when your supposed too. Its just like a huge feeling of let down if don't and if decide to "quit" while training for BUD/s then what's going to stop me from quitting in BUD/s.

                    Also a friend of mine said that self motivation is the most important motivation because when your freezing your butt off and you want to quit you don't have your dad there or your friend there motivating you to stay. I have been working out for close to a year straight by myself to build a strong foundation for BUD/s and to keep myself healthy, and even though its not like BUD/s training i still have learned a lot about myself about how to keep myself motivated and other little things that can really help someone grow as a person mentally because you know what to do when your feeling discouraged or broke down so when you get to BUD/s and they beat you down in the first day you are familiar with how counter those feelings and talk yourself through training. I don't think Im the strongest mentally cause im a tadpole just like everyone else and i would be arrogant if i did. i just really hate failing and the feeling of letting myself down or more importantly letting someone else down.

                    I totally understand what you're saying about letting yourself down, and letting other people down. When I was discharged, I felt like I let my family down, my father down, and everyone who I promised to that I would complete what I set out to do down. There's nothing more discouraging than the feeling of failure. On top of that, I had not sent in any college applications, so I couldn't go to school, and I couldn't find a job for months. I felt like I hit lower than rock bottom. Like me, you need to teach yourself to not keep kicking yourself everytime you feel like you failed at doing something, like working out that day. If you beat yourself down like that, you're only gonna make it worse on yourself. The key is to recognize what you did wrong, learn from it, and then forget about it. Whether it's during BUDS, or RTC, you're going to screw something up. That's the point of training. When you screw something up, the instructors are going to test you to see if you're going to keep kicking yourself down about it, and if you do, they will be all over you. The SEALs don't want guys who worry about screwing up. They want guys who are able to deal with the stress of what happens if they do screw up. It doesn't matter how good you are, in combat, nothing ever goes according to plan. In training, you're not going to get everything right, especially the first time. That's why it's called training.

                    Another thing about BUDS, yes it helps to be a self motivated person, but even the most independent person in the class can be discouraged. You don't get through BUDS as an individual. You get through BUDS as part of a team. In hell week, when you are at your absolute low, and you feel like quitting, it's the guys next to you who are motivating you and saying "Come on dude, let's keep going. Don't give up." And then when they hit that low, it's you who will be saying the same things to them. In BUDS, it's not just about relying on yourself to make it through, it's about forming a bond with the guys in the class so when you do feel like quitting, they won't let you. And when they do, you will be thanking them later on "Thanks for not letting me quit." And they will be saying the same thing to you. You need those guys, and they need you. Keep working hard, and never be discouraged.
                    "When you come to the end of your rope, tie a knot and hang on."-- Franklin D. Roosevelt

                    "Our greatest glory is not in never failing, but in rising up every time we fail" -- Ralph Waldo Emerson

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                    • #11
                      Re: Mental Weakness

                      did you make it to BUD/s before you got discharged? When are you going back?

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                      • #12
                        Re: Mental Weakness

                        Originally posted by mmarino View Post
                        did you make it to BUD/s before you got discharged? When are you going back?

                        No, I did not make it to BUDS. I was discharged during Basic. That's what made it so hard for me, because I couldn't even get through basic because of something that wasn't my fault, but whatever. It's kind of a complicated situation for me. Because I was recieving grief counciling, I can't re-enlist until the Navy acknowloge's that I'm no longer recieving medical treatment. I'm hoping to recieve authorization within a couple of weeks. I don't intend to be rude, but this is kind of my problem right now.
                        "When you come to the end of your rope, tie a knot and hang on."-- Franklin D. Roosevelt

                        "Our greatest glory is not in never failing, but in rising up every time we fail" -- Ralph Waldo Emerson

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                        • #13
                          Re: Mental Weakness

                          "The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in times of comfort, but where he stands in times of challenge and controversy."

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                          • #14
                            Re: Mental Weakness

                            Originally posted by SR1020 View Post
                            "The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in times of comfort, but where he stands in times of challenge and controversy."
                            Good quote (Martin Luther King, Jr. by the way).
                            "Some people dream of worthy accomplishments while others stay awake and do them." -anonymous

                            "Circumstance does not make the man; it reveals him to himself." -James Allen

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