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Motivation will only go so far

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  • Motivation will only go so far

    Something I think we all need to understand is that motivation is temporary. It's inconsistent. Motivation is only supposed to get you started. Do you think that you'll be motivated all the time at bud/s? Hell no. Consistancy is very important. It means you get the the job done regardless of the conditions. If that means that you need to do things you don't want to do then that's what it takes. Doing things you don't want to do builds something far more powerful then motivation. Discipline. Discipline takes you places that motivation will never get you. Having discipline means that you will do everything you need to do to to accomplish your goals. Including things you hate. In some aspects you need to be like a robot. You need to do what you need to do regardless of your feelings. This I think is the key to making it through bud/s. This being said, if you haven't gotten started pursuing your dream watch one of these videos. http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=9z4Kft47kBM. http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=g-jwWYX7Jlo. http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=CMm6tDavSXg. If those videos don't get you motivated, I don't know what will. Let this be the last time you need to get motivated for anything. After this, start focusing on being more disciplined because discipline is what'll help you in the longrun. Not motivation.

  • #2
    Re: Motivation will only go so far

    Goosebumps man. I like this post thanks aldav13!
    Treat your men as you would your own beloved sons. And they will follow you into the deepest valley.
    ― Sun Tzu, The Art of War

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    • #3
      Re: Motivation will only go so far

      Good read man.
      I used to completely rely on motivation during training sessions and realized that when I had a ton of motivation my workouts were much better than the contrary.
      Keeping your head up and eyes on the prize you will have a much better chance at succeeding.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Motivation will only go so far

        This post really hits home for me, aldav13. I am two months into the NSW Physical Training Guide and if I'm being honest with myself, I don't have quite the same "vigor" as I did when I first started. Instead of hitting the ground running when the alarm clock sounds off at 4:00 am, it's now more of a "****, it's early".

        My reaction to this(and I believe most BUD/S candidates reactions, ie. the high dropout rate) is to question whether or not this is something that is really wanted. Until I read your post, that question has lingered in my head.

        You could not be more right about motivation. Motivation is the ignition to the journey you set out on; it only carries you so far. During that time when you are highly motivated it is up to you to develop the discipline to continue to train and push forward. To go the gym when you'd rather sleep in. To eat healthy when you would cut your left hand off for some Chick fil A.The discipline you develop and the training of your mind is what separates those that succeed at BUD/S and those that do not...IMO.

        Long story short, the reason for my post is to thank you. Thank you for helping me understand that although the "motivation" that I felt when I made the decision to work towards a spot on the Teams isn't as strong as it used to be, the desire is still there. More importantly, your emphasis on discipline has taught me something very valuable as well. The more you don't want to do something, the more valuable it is to hold yourself accountable and do it.

        Thank you again and best of luck to you in your endeavors.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Motivation will only go so far

          Wow, I wish I had read this thread four years ago. I would likely be in a very different place now. I definitely agree that discipline is more important than motivation. Or at least it is after you have been training for a while. Once you have gotten going training don't EVER let diminished motivation trick you into second guessing if becoming a SEAL is really what you want to pursue. I guess I'm talking to myself as much as anybody when I say that.

          There will be days, weeks, maybe even months where you don't feel motivated at all but the desire to be a SEAL is still there. Keep training, keep pushing. Don't ever stop unless you absolutely know that this is not what you want to pursue. (If you're not sure, think about your life 30 years from now. If you think you will regret not having made it at least to BUD/S, then keep training and keep your focus on the goal.)

          A little of my background since I'm new to the forums:

          Like many here, becoming a team guy has been the only thing I have REALLY wanted to do with my life for as long as I can remember. At least since I was 9 or 10. I was that guy in high school who knew exactly what he wanted to be and was working hard to get there. I trained hard all my senior year and by the end of the summer after I graduated I had good PST scores and was nearly finished with Stew Smith's 12 Weeks to BUD/S program. The summer of graduation I worked my butt off pushing carts at Sam's Club for 6 months so I could pay my own way through both weeks of Senior Chief Shipley's Extreme SEAL courses that fall. Throughout all of this I always felt fired up and motivated and I felt 10x so when I returned from ESE. I felt like I could do anything.

          Then a couple months later something new happened: my motivation plummeted off the charts for no obvious reason. Looking back it was probably just burn out and could have been fixed by mixing up my training and finding some other guys to train with (I had always trained completely alone). However, not knowing what I know now, I started second guessing if becoming a SEAL was right for me because I didn't feel motivated anymore.. I told myself "If I'm having doubts now, there is no way I will make it through Hell Week". Through that line of thinking I basically convinced myself I should pursue other things. I didn't realize that a lack of motivation for a period of time shouldn't be confused with a lack of desire. Discipline would have gotten me through.

          That was four years ago, November of 2010. In the time since I have pursued other things I thought I may enjoy. I finished an Associates Degree and am working on a Bachelor's. I've worked one full time job and explored a lot of part time jobs to see what I like. I do all of the hobbies I enjoy. Hiking, camping, rock climbing, riding motorcycles. Hell, I even nearly got married. Through all of this, that desire to pursue becoming a SEAL has still been there. Sometimes quietly in the back of my mind, sometimes it has been all I could think about. I have silently known that nothing else would ever satisfy me yet I've stubbornly refused to admit that to myself. I kept telling myself that if I couldn't stay motivated to train, I wasn't motivated enough to make it through BUD/S.

          What I didn't understand until recently is that motivation isn't everything. Like has been said, it's the booster to get you going but it won't always be so strong and that is okay. Where motivation leaves off, discipline and commitment take over. Commitment to your decision to crawl, walk, and run on a difficult and challenging path with the odds stacked against you. Discipline to train harder every day, even if you don't feel like it, because that is what is required. It is a process building the attitude and the physical/mental strength required for BUD/S and beyond. There will be days you fail at training, days you don't feel like you are tough enough, strong enough, or resistant to quitting enough. That's okay, keep going. It's a process, sometimes slow and painful. But your mind gets stronger every time you train, along with your body.

          Anyways, I'm sorry for the book length post but I hope it helps some guys who read it. I don't want anybody to make the same mistakes I made and I hope this will be encouraging for anybody who has the desire but is second guessing it because of low motivation. If you're wondering, I am back on track training again. I'm 2 weeks into the Physical Training Guide and I'm depressingly weak compared to my former peaks, but I know I will get back there and beyond.

          Train hard brothers! "You don't gotta like it, you just gotta do it"

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Motivation will only go so far

            Originally posted by DeltaAlphaNovember View Post
            Wow, I wish I had read this thread four years ago. I would likely be in a very different place now. I definitely agree that discipline is more important than motivation. Or at least it is after you have been training for a while. Once you have gotten going training don't EVER let diminished motivation trick you into second guessing if becoming a SEAL is really what you want to pursue. I guess I'm talking to myself as much as anybody when I say that.

            There will be days, weeks, maybe even months where you don't feel motivated at all but the desire to be a SEAL is still there. Keep training, keep pushing. Don't ever stop unless you absolutely know that this is not what you want to pursue. (If you're not sure, think about your life 30 years from now. If you think you will regret not having made it at least to BUD/S, then keep training and keep your focus on the goal.)

            A little of my background since I'm new to the forums:

            Like many here, becoming a team guy has been the only thing I have REALLY wanted to do with my life for as long as I can remember. At least since I was 9 or 10. I was that guy in high school who knew exactly what he wanted to be and was working hard to get there. I trained hard all my senior year and by the end of the summer after I graduated I had good PST scores and was nearly finished with Stew Smith's 12 Weeks to BUD/S program. The summer of graduation I worked my butt off pushing carts at Sam's Club for 6 months so I could pay my own way through both weeks of Senior Chief Shipley's Extreme SEAL courses that fall. Throughout all of this I always felt fired up and motivated and I felt 10x so when I returned from ESE. I felt like I could do anything.

            Then a couple months later something new happened: my motivation plummeted off the charts for no obvious reason. Looking back it was probably just burn out and could have been fixed by mixing up my training and finding some other guys to train with (I had always trained completely alone). However, not knowing what I know now, I started second guessing if becoming a SEAL was right for me because I didn't feel motivated anymore.. I told myself "If I'm having doubts now, there is no way I will make it through Hell Week". Through that line of thinking I basically convinced myself I should pursue other things. I didn't realize that a lack of motivation for a period of time shouldn't be confused with a lack of desire. Discipline would have gotten me through.

            That was four years ago, November of 2010. In the time since I have pursued other things I thought I may enjoy. I finished an Associates Degree and am working on a Bachelor's. I've worked one full time job and explored a lot of part time jobs to see what I like. I do all of the hobbies I enjoy. Hiking, camping, rock climbing, riding motorcycles. Hell, I even nearly got married. Through all of this, that desire to pursue becoming a SEAL has still been there. Sometimes quietly in the back of my mind, sometimes it has been all I could think about. I have silently known that nothing else would ever satisfy me yet I've stubbornly refused to admit that to myself. I kept telling myself that if I couldn't stay motivated to train, I wasn't motivated enough to make it through BUD/S.

            What I didn't understand until recently is that motivation isn't everything. Like has been said, it's the booster to get you going but it won't always be so strong and that is okay. Where motivation leaves off, discipline and commitment take over. Commitment to your decision to crawl, walk, and run on a difficult and challenging path with the odds stacked against you. Discipline to train harder every day, even if you don't feel like it, because that is what is required. It is a process building the attitude and the physical/mental strength required for BUD/S and beyond. There will be days you fail at training, days you don't feel like you are tough enough, strong enough, or resistant to quitting enough. That's okay, keep going. It's a process, sometimes slow and painful. But your mind gets stronger every time you train, along with your body.

            Anyways, I'm sorry for the book length post but I hope it helps some guys who read it. I don't want anybody to make the same mistakes I made and I hope this will be encouraging for anybody who has the desire but is second guessing it because of low motivation. If you're wondering, I am back on track training again. I'm 2 weeks into the Physical Training Guide and I'm depressingly weak compared to my former peaks, but I know I will get back there and beyond.

            Train hard brothers! "You don't gotta like it, you just gotta do it"
            You're not alone man. I've had doubts that I could make it through BUD/S plenty of times. I've almost gave up, but now seeing this thread I don't think I ever will. I left my dad's advice in the dust and screwed up, and I'm not going to do it again. This is some good stuff. Some day after you retire from the Teams, I think you'll be a good motivational speaker for people aspiring to become SEAL's themselves. Thank you for the uplifting
            You've all been taught that Thou shall not kill. Well, hear this.
            F*ck...That...Sh*t! - SSGT Sykes (film Jarhead)

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Motivation will only go so far

              That was an awesome post DeltaAlphaNovember. Thanks

              Comment

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