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  • SWCC First?

    I have a great deal of respect for both Navy SEALS and Navy SWCC operators. My original plan was to come straight out of highschool and get a contract to go to BUD/S. However the more I learn about the training the more realistic I have become with myself. I have always wanted to be a SEAL but I'm concerned on whether or not it is a smart decision to do it at 18 years old.

    My question is, what does everyone think about going through SWCC training first and spend some time in the SF community/maturing and then going for BUD/S. I'd appreciate it if we didn't use this opportunity to call people cowards for going to SWCC instead or whatever. This is simply a question that I'm interested to hear what others think.

  • #2
    If you take the SWCC or any other route, then your chances of getting into BUD/S is extremely slim. There's about 5-6 BUD/S classes a year and the Navy takes about 18-24 active duty sailors per BUD/S class per year. If you want SEAL, then go SEAL! If you have any second thoughts then maybe you aren't mentally prepared to stick to plan A. There is enough info about this on this forum.

    Respectively, Roboscout

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    • #3
      Yeah I agree with Roboscout. Adding to what he said, there are a few things to keep in mind.

      If you want to go SEAL, you have to have absolute confidence that it is what you want to do and that you can do it. If you're uncertain now, how uncertain are you going to be when you're getting destroyed in the cold on no sleep? If you are apprehensive about it, then don't even bother.

      However, if you truly want to go SEAL, don't be realistic with yourself and your goals. Attack it with everything you have and don't quit. With that and a bit of luck, you'll be fine. Don't short-sell your potential or set the bar low and become complacent. Aim high, miss high!

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      • #4
        https://www.sealswcc.com/forums/foru...being-resolute
        "Those who will not risk cannot win" - John Paul Jones

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        • #5
          Thank you all for your input, and JJones that link helped answer a lot of my questions. I'll work on getting my head right, because I do want it! But like the saying goes, "the more you learn, the less you feel like you know"

          thanks again

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          • #6
            SWCC is its own animal. I think viewing SWCC like its a baby step towards becoming a SEAL is very much the wrong way to look at it. It's its own giant mountain to climb, just like being a SEAL. Better anyway to pick one and start becoming an expert sooner.

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            • #7
              I've had some of the same thoughts before. Another option is to join another branch like the Marine Corps as infantry, and then go for BUD/S when you're done with that. I've heard of several team guys who were former Marines and said the infantry experience was really helpful.

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              • #8
                Sounds like you are conflicted..... before you join any military branch first ask yourself what your mission outline is. Why are you joining the unit you are joining and what does the unit you are joining specialize in? I was given great advice from a current operator that I should look into and familiarize myself with all SF branches. Why do you want to join SWCC? Why do you want to join SEAL? How do those help further your life mission outline?

                http://www.themilitaryleader.com/9-m...sof-selection/

                SWCC specialize in different missions than the SEALS, as do the Green Berets, Army SF, Pararescue Jumpers. Do you want to run a gun and hunt bad dudes, or do you want to specialize in some other aspect.

                Once your life mission outline of what you want to achieve is outlined then you can better find the unit that helps you achieve that.

                I am 23 and thank the universe for the course of events that did not make me join at 18, at that age one is far to inexperienced with the realities of adulthood. Take some time find out what you like and don't like, hone yourself as much as you can while you work towards outlining your mission and aligning with the unit that carries it out best. Do not rush yourself everything happens in its time, the average age of an operator is around 32 years old so just keep strong, safe and nurture your mind, body and SPIRIT to be the complete person you are meant to be when you walk into that recruiters office.

                Remember there is more to these units that just being physically bad ***. Be mentally, emotionally, spiritually, physically badass. Nurture your whole self and others aswell once you learn to do for self.
                "Lord, let me not prove unworthy of my brothers."

                "Ace Ventura: If you were me, then I'd be you, and I'd use *your* body to get to the top. You can't stop me no matter who you are!"

                “Around here, however, we don't look backwards for very long. We keep moving forward, opening up new doors and doing new things, because we're curious... and curiosity keeps leading us down new paths.” - Walt Disney

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Forestman View Post
                  I've had some of the same thoughts before. Another option is to join another branch like the Marine Corps as infantry, and then go for BUD/S when you're done with that. I've heard of several team guys who were former Marines and said the infantry experience was really helpful.
                  The biggest reason I would avoid this route is that infantry is known for turning young men into old men. You can't make it through BUD/S if you have arthritis and herniated disks, and infantry is notorious for doing this to young men in their twenties no matter how much in shape they were in service.
                  "Do not pray for easy lives. Pray to be stronger men. Do not pray for tasks equal to your powers. Pray for powers equal to your tasks. Then the doing of your work shall be no miracle. But you shall be a miracle." -Phillips Brooks

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by NeverGivingUp View Post

                    The biggest reason I would avoid this route is that infantry is known for turning young men into old men. You can't make it through BUD/S if you have arthritis and herniated disks, and infantry is notorious for doing this to young men in their twenties no matter how much in shape they were in service.
                    This is why I wish the military would switch from an endurance model to a strength-first model of fitness, but hey, what do I know.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by tfranc View Post

                      This is why I wish the military would switch from an endurance model to a strength-first model of fitness, but hey, what do I know.
                      I agree with the fact that one needs to have strength for longevity...but then why is running the biggest predictor of success in hell week and not strength? Could it be because running is the most mentally demanding aspect?
                      "Those who will not risk cannot win" - John Paul Jones

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by JJones View Post

                        I agree with the fact that one needs to have strength for longevity...but then why is running the biggest predictor of success in hell week and not strength? Could it be because running is the most mentally demanding aspect?
                        I don't know if it's the most mentally demanding, but it's certainly the thing you're doing the most during the week. I've heard that guys log around 400 miles of running during hell week. Strength is the only adaptation that lends itself to every other aspect of fitness for baseline improvement in performance. A stronger runner is a faster runner. A stronger swimmer is a faster swimmer. And a faster runner/swimmer has better potential to add endurance more quickly. A stronger back means fewer back injuries. Stronger shoulders mean fewer shoulder injuries. I would love to see a study done with new marine recruits that gauges the effectiveness of strength for injury prevention aka, each man in the control has to get their squat up to 315 for example - a very doable thing in less than half a year.
                        Last edited by tfranc; 01-30-2017, 09:00 AM.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by tfranc View Post

                          Yes I think so. I've heard that guys log around 400 miles of running during hell week. Strength is the only adaptation that lends itself to every other aspect of fitness for baseline improvement in performance. A stronger runner is a faster runner. A stronger swimmer is a faster swimmer. And a faster runner/swimmer has better potential to add endurance more quickly. A stronger back means fewer back injuries. Stronger shoulders mean fewer shoulder injuries. I would love to see a study done with new marine recruits that gauges the effectiveness of strength for injury prevention aka, each man in the control has to get their squat up to 315 for example - a very doable thing in less than half a year.
                          The Army now has an additional fitness test for recruits called the OPAT, in which the score determines what jobs they physically qualify for. All the events are strength based except for the run.
                          "Do not pray for easy lives. Pray to be stronger men. Do not pray for tasks equal to your powers. Pray for powers equal to your tasks. Then the doing of your work shall be no miracle. But you shall be a miracle." -Phillips Brooks

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by NeverGivingUp View Post

                            The Army now has an additional fitness test for recruits called the OPAT, in which the score determines what jobs they physically qualify for. All the events are strength based except for the run.
                            Oh interesting. Seems like they're coming around finally. I wonder what they're protocol is for event preparation.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by tfranc View Post

                              I don't know if it's the most mentally demanding, but it's certainly the thing you're doing the most during the week. I've heard that guys log around 400 miles of running during hell week. Strength is the only adaptation that lends itself to every other aspect of fitness for baseline improvement in performance. A stronger runner is a faster runner. A stronger swimmer is a faster swimmer. And a faster runner/swimmer has better potential to add endurance more quickly. A stronger back means fewer back injuries. Stronger shoulders mean fewer shoulder injuries. I would love to see a study done with new marine recruits that gauges the effectiveness of strength for injury prevention aka, each man in the control has to get their squat up to 315 for example - a very doable thing in less than half a year.
                              Good points. I would like to point out that long distance running (7+ miles) builds good leg, bone and connective tissue strength as well.
                              "Those who will not risk cannot win" - John Paul Jones

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