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  • #16
    Originally posted by JJones View Post

    Good points. I would like to point out that long distance running (7+ miles) builds good leg, bone and connective tissue strength as well.
    Sure, but take it from me: I was running 30+ miles per week when I started a dedicated strength training program. Day 1, week 1, I squatted 85 lbs for a 3x5. That was my maximum effort. I weighed 155 lbs at 6'. So for all the hundreds of miles I had ran in the months prior to strength training, the best I could do was 85 lbs for a combined total of 15 reps.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by tfranc View Post

      Sure, but take it from me: I was running 30+ miles per week when I started a dedicated strength training program. Day 1, week 1, I squatted 85 lbs for a 3x5. That was my maximum effort. I weighed 155 lbs at 6'. So for all the hundreds of miles I had ran in the months prior to strength training, the best I could do was 85 lbs for a combined total of 15 reps.
      This is very important for many people to realize. I was running 30+ miles/week as well. According to my running tracker I've been using for almost 3 years, I've ran over 3,000 miles in that time frame. I neglected legs thinking that my running would be enough to strengthen them and my core work would be enough to stabilize the muscles in my thighs. I was dead wrong. My one rep max for deadlift was around 200lbs when I first started working on legs (granted I am 5'6 and 120lbs). I now do 8x200lb deadlift nowadays with no problem after a month of training legs (not impressive, I know, but we all gotta start somewhere). Seriously, don't skip leg day thinking running will take care of it. JJones is absolutely right when he says that it builds good leg, bone, and connective tissue strength.
      "Do not pray for easy lives. Pray to be stronger men. Do not pray for tasks equal to your powers. Pray for powers equal to your tasks. Then the doing of your work shall be no miracle. But you shall be a miracle." -Phillips Brooks

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      • #18
        Originally posted by tfranc View Post

        Sure, but take it from me: I was running 30+ miles per week when I started a dedicated strength training program. Day 1, week 1, I squatted 85 lbs for a 3x5. That was my maximum effort. I weighed 155 lbs at 6'. So for all the hundreds of miles I had ran in the months prior to strength training, the best I could do was 85 lbs for a combined total of 15 reps.
        I totally agree with you. What I said wasn't trying to discredit the importance of strength training at all. Rather I was trying to emphasize how important distance running is. When one uses the two in conjunction with each other, likelihood of injury decreases dramatically. Take it from someone who started a dedicated strength training program just after I peaked my cross country season with a 50 mile week (including a 10.2 mile run ) after that week my legs felt amazing and I felt exhausted. When I began the strength training (I was crazy weak when I started as well) my speed increased while my injury rate decreased.

        The human body really is amazing if you utilize it properly.
        "Those who will not risk cannot win" - John Paul Jones

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        • #19
          Originally posted by tfranc View Post

          Oh interesting. Seems like they're coming around finally. I wonder what they're protocol is for event preparation.
          I really have no clue what the protocol is for event preparation, but one of my friends in Army DEP says that the test is really easy even for those who have average strength. He invited me to take the test with him at his recruiting station, and it really isn't that hard to get the "Black" category (the highest category needed for combat jobs). The test is unique in that there are 4 events and each event is scored by different categories (Black being hardest and Gold being easiest). In order to qualify for combat jobs, you need to get Black in all 4 events. If you get Black in 3 events, but Gold in one, then you are overall qualified for jobs that are rated for Gold (which is mostly admin/desk type jobs) and therefore don't qualify for infantry and other combat related jobs. The test mostly tests for strength and explosive power.
          "Do not pray for easy lives. Pray to be stronger men. Do not pray for tasks equal to your powers. Pray for powers equal to your tasks. Then the doing of your work shall be no miracle. But you shall be a miracle." -Phillips Brooks

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          • #20
            Originally posted by JJones View Post
            I totally agree with you. What I said wasn't trying to discredit the importance of strength training at all. Rather I was trying to emphasize how important distance running is. When one uses the two in conjunction with each other, likelihood of injury decreases dramatically. Take it from someone who started a dedicated strength training program just after I peaked my cross country season with a 50 mile week (including a 10.2 mile run ) after that week my legs felt amazing and I felt exhausted. When I began the strength training (I was crazy weak when I started as well) my speed increased while my injury rate decreased.

            The human body really is amazing if you utilize it properly.
            Sorry, I was in friendly debate mode :-) I understand what you are saying. There's a guy I've been in contact with who's going EOD who squats around 405. He mentioned to me he went from 2-25 miles per week in less than a month with zero injuries - obviously not the smartest idea, but just goes to show the power of being strong.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by NeverGivingUp View Post

              This is very important for many people to realize. I was running 30+ miles/week as well. According to my running tracker I've been using for almost 3 years, I've ran over 3,000 miles in that time frame. I neglected legs thinking that my running would be enough to strengthen them and my core work would be enough to stabilize the muscles in my thighs. I was dead wrong. My one rep max for deadlift was around 200lbs when I first started working on legs (granted I am 5'6 and 120lbs). I now do 8x200lb deadlift nowadays with no problem after a month of training legs (not impressive, I know, but we all gotta start somewhere). Seriously, don't skip leg day thinking running will take care of it. JJones is absolutely right when he says that it builds good leg, bone, and connective tissue strength.
              Same here. Another interesting thing - my best plank was 3 minutes prior to strength training at 155 lbs. I got my squat over 300 lbs, and tried planking for the first time in a year and got 1.5 minutes at 225 lbs bw. And the first minute was incredibly easy. Pretty crazy.

              Originally posted by NeverGivingUp View Post

              I really have no clue what the protocol is for event preparation, but one of my friends in Army DEP says that the test is really easy even for those who have average strength. He invited me to take the test with him at his recruiting station, and it really isn't that hard to get the "Black" category (the highest category needed for combat jobs). The test is unique in that there are 4 events and each event is scored by different categories (Black being hardest and Gold being easiest). In order to qualify for combat jobs, you need to get Black in all 4 events. If you get Black in 3 events, but Gold in one, then you are overall qualified for jobs that are rated for Gold (which is mostly admin/desk type jobs) and therefore don't qualify for infantry and other combat related jobs. The test mostly tests for strength and explosive power.
              So sandbag carries, tire flips, sprints or something like that. That's awesome. Every time I've heard guys in combat talk about what they wish they had more of, it's almost never more endurance or that they wish they would have done more push ups. It's always things like being faster and more explosive - both strength based. Seems like the Army is catching on.

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