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  • Prior Service

    I'm currently on an extension to contract in order to execute orders to Okinawa, Japan. I'm interested in all things challenging and hard, especially getting away from my current job working solely with electronics. I came across this site almost by accident. I have been sharking it like crazy though since I found it. I'm currently trying to explore options for when my tour on Okinawa is done, and doing my best to prepare for all courses of action. My first choice would be to stay "green" and put int some time with USMC Security Forces, and USMC Embassy Security Guards. I say that's my first choice mainly because it's where I'm at and does not require me getting out of the service at all to do. At this point in time with the current economical hardships our country is facing, and the uncertainty I keep hearing about the size of our military, getting out for any reason seems very risky to me. This does bring up some questions though. Is there a way to do all of the required testing and be accepted prior to separating from active duty? I would like the gap between active duty stints to be as short as possible. As I said, much of my hesitation comes from not wanting to leave active service. There used to be rumors floating around about Marines trying out for SEALs and then changing service to the Navy, I'm curious if this is still true, and if so, why is this not available in SWCC as well? Lastly, does SWCC do any CQB training at all? I appreciate all the help and answers any can give me.
    "Cry 'Havoc,' and let slip the dogs of war" Shakespeare
    "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing" Edmund Burke

  • #2
    Re: Prior Service

    Two things:

    1. You cannot get into BUD/S or SEALs unless you're in the Navy.
    2. It's been talked about in other threads, but just to cut this short, they are currently not allowing anyone with prior service to join/try out for BUD/S.

    Someone can correct me if I'm wrong.
    "But the bravest are surely those who have the clearest vision of what is before them, glory and danger alike, and yet notwithstanding go out to meet it." - Thucydides

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    • #3
      Re: Prior Service

      @ lion-Huh, hope that is not true. Howdy Bigcountry, google the magazine Popular Mechanics for an article about SWCC. There is a wealth of information there. As far as advanced schools go, it is always changing from what I have heard (reliable source), so you never know. Still can't answer your transition question bubba.
      America will never seek a permission slip to defend the security of our people.
      George W. Bush

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      • #4
        Re: Prior Service

        Battletoad,
        I'm guessing this is the article you meant? It's a good read for sure, and just thought I would post it here to share with anyone else who is interested.
        http://www.popularmechanics.com/tech...litary/4303591
        "Cry 'Havoc,' and let slip the dogs of war" Shakespeare
        "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing" Edmund Burke

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        • #5
          Re: Prior Service

          At this time, the Navy is NOT taking any OSVETs (Other Service Veterans) or NAVETs (Navy Veterans) for SEAL and SWCC.
          Navy SEAL & SWCC Scout Team

          "The cost of freedom is always high, but Americans have always paid it. And one path we shall never choose, and that is the path of surrender, or submission."

          John F. Kennedy
          35th President of U.S. 1961-1963 (1917 - 1963)

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          • #6
            Re: Prior Service

            does that include Navy reservists? How often does NSW change who they are excepting and why (particularly reservists)?

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            • #7
              Re: Prior Service

              If you want to be a reserve SWCC, you must first join the reserves and be in a regular drilling status in any rate. Once you are in the system, you may immediately apply to be a SWCC. The same standards for active duty apply for reserve SWCC in terms of ASVAB, PST, etc. Also, you must be 30 years old or younger, and E5 or junior. A waiver may be granted for 31 year-olds, but you'd have to absolutely blow away the PST. If this is the route you want to take, let me know when you are in the Navy Reserve and ready to apply to the program and I'll put you in touch with our Reserve SWCC accessions officer and he'll walk you through the process.
              Navy SEAL & SWCC Scout Team

              "The cost of freedom is always high, but Americans have always paid it. And one path we shall never choose, and that is the path of surrender, or submission."

              John F. Kennedy
              35th President of U.S. 1961-1963 (1917 - 1963)

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              • #8
                Re: Prior Service

                The Navy should at least Honor a ratio of it's own NAVETS for the SEAL/SWCC program, taking in account the way the economy is. It's an ethical view.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Prior Service

                  Originally posted by Scott Williams View Post
                  If you want to be a reserve SWCC, you must first join the reserves and be in a regular drilling status in any rate. Once you are in the system, you may immediately apply to be a SWCC. The same standards for active duty apply for reserve SWCC in terms of ASVAB, PST, etc. Also, you must be 30 years old or younger, and E5 or junior. A waiver may be granted for 31 year-olds, but you'd have to absolutely blow away the PST. If this is the route you want to take, let me know when you are in the Navy Reserve and ready to apply to the program and I'll put you in touch with our Reserve SWCC accessions officer and he'll walk you through the process.
                  Is this still true? Im 27 and a SW2 currently. Will be 28 almost 29 before im ready to do this.

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                  • #10
                    Re: Prior Service

                    Originally posted by Scott Williams View Post
                    At this time, the Navy is NOT taking any OSVETs (Other Service Veterans) or NAVETs (Navy Veterans) for SEAL and SWCC.
                    Mr Williams with all due respect, why is the navy not taking OSVETS or NAVETS?

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                    • #11
                      Re: Prior Service

                      He answered this in another reservist post but basically its because NSW can get more out of someone fresh off the streets than someone who has been in for 4-5 years.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Prior Service

                        Originally posted by JJones View Post
                        Mr Williams with all due respect, why is the navy not taking OSVETS or NAVETS?
                        Beancounters in Big Navy determine our manning accession quota every year by balancing the need for more bodies against what we already have and projected losses (mostly guys getting out, either after an enlistment or retirement). The number is the total amount of accessions through the training pipeline that will be allowed per year. A certain percentage is allotted to fleet transfers; guys who cross-rate from some other rating. Then recruiters fill the rest with guys off the street, including (potentially) veterans.
                        When examining an application package from a veteran, Navy or otherwise, the master chief that conducts the draft must consider all aspects of the candidate and balance it against the competition. For instance, there is time in service. If you served six years before you got out, then he knows that he can get at least 14 more years out of you before you are eligible for retirement. Perhaps 12 of those years are going to be operational, since BUD/S sucks up the first 1-2. A guy off the street with no prior experience will give him 18 years of operational time. The veteran is most likely going to be older than many of his non-vet candidates, so he may physically break down faster in comparison. However, if the veteran is still relatively young (in his 20's), can post a great PST (good health and fitness), and has prior SOF experience (short learning curve, immediate impact), then he is an attractive option.
                        Unfortunately, most veterans are up against guys fresh off the street with no waivers, in excellent shape, and plenty of good physical years ahead of them. A NAVET or OSVET essentially must beat all the odds to win a contract, and a non-prior SOF guy isn't even going to be considered. A Fleet guy does have a shot though. So the NAVET or OSVET could join the Navy in a different rating, do two years, then drop a package for BUD/S and be considered -- as long as his total time in service doesn't exceed six years and his rank doesn't exceed E5.
                        Navy SEAL & SWCC Scout Team

                        "The cost of freedom is always high, but Americans have always paid it. And one path we shall never choose, and that is the path of surrender, or submission."

                        John F. Kennedy
                        35th President of U.S. 1961-1963 (1917 - 1963)

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Prior Service

                          Originally posted by Scott Williams View Post
                          Beancounters in Big Navy determine our manning accession quota every year by balancing the need for more bodies against what we already have and projected losses (mostly guys getting out, either after an enlistment or retirement). The number is the total amount of accessions through the training pipeline that will be allowed per year. A certain percentage is allotted to fleet transfers; guys who cross-rate from some other rating. Then recruiters fill the rest with guys off the street, including (potentially) veterans.
                          When examining an application package from a veteran, Navy or otherwise, the master chief that conducts the draft must consider all aspects of the candidate and balance it against the competition. For instance, there is time in service. If you served six years before you got out, then he knows that he can get at least 14 more years out of you before you are eligible for retirement. Perhaps 12 of those years are going to be operational, since BUD/S sucks up the first 1-2. A guy off the street with no prior experience will give him 18 years of operational time. The veteran is most likely going to be older than many of his non-vet candidates, so he may physically break down faster in comparison. However, if the veteran is still relatively young (in his 20's), can post a great PST (good health and fitness), and has prior SOF experience (short learning curve, immediate impact), then he is an attractive option.
                          Unfortunately, most veterans are up against guys fresh off the street with no waivers, in excellent shape, and plenty of good physical years ahead of them. A NAVET or OSVET essentially must beat all the odds to win a contract, and a non-prior SOF guy isn't even going to be considered. A Fleet guy does have a shot though. So the NAVET or OSVET could join the Navy in a different rating, do two years, then drop a package for BUD/S and be considered -- as long as his total time in service doesn't exceed six years and his rank doesn't exceed E5.
                          Ok, that makes sense. Thank you for your reply, sir.

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