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Thread: Freakin Cold Water.

  1. #1

    Freakin Cold Water.

    Hooyah!! Did anyone take an Ice bath after their run today?! Or did you not even go running? Cause I know I didn't. Yet. haha That BUD/S water is hellishly cold. get used to it guys.
    minimum is only minimum

  2. #2
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    Re: Freakin Cold Water.

    This is kind of an odd post.

  3. #3

    Re: Freakin Cold Water.


  4. #4
    Senior Member jtrex39's Avatar
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    Re: Freakin Cold Water.

    I think we all know where this thread is heading to.

  5. #5

    Re: Freakin Cold Water.

    You cannot prepare for the cold water of BUD/S. All you can do is be in the best physical shape of your life when you report for First Phase. Below is a video link of SEALs talking about their experience with the cold in BUD/s.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=36Lqc...e_gdata_player

  6. #6
    Senior Member JZachariahG's Avatar
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    Re: Freakin Cold Water.

    Well I stumbled upon a conspiracy, the Navy must of decided that the best way to prepare people for BUD/s is Swim teams on Navy bases and the SEAL mentor program, well I am on a swim team in Kings Bay, GA, Naval Sub Base. So the plan is to "fix" the heater so it only works when it is warmish outside, but once it gets below 40-50degrees, the heater stops working. This my friends is either the Navy's new biggest secret, or a prank the lifeguard or SEALs here play on us.
    "Do the right thing even if it means dying like a dog when no one's there to see you do it." Vice Admiral James Stockdale, Navy Pilot

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    Re: Freakin Cold Water.

    Something I've noticed with cold water:

    I do my swimming our local park, where a stream runs into this concrete cut-out pool type thing. The water is anywhere from 48 - 60 degrees in the summer. I remember the first time I got in that water a while back, it was colder than ****. I said, "**** this, how can anyone swim in cold water?" I'm skinny, too. 6 feet, 150 pounds and I felt like a popsicle. But I kept going back. I would get my legs in for 20 minutes at first. Then my waist. then my arms and my shoulders. Then I started swimming. I did some research and there is evidence that your body actually adapts to cold water over time with constant exposure, just like your body gets used to an exercise, so you have to crank it up a notch to work it more. It actually becomes more efficient with blood circulation and holding in heat. Mentally, I think getting used to the initial shock in the first 2 - 3 minutes while you're still getting used to the water becomes less and less of a big deal. Now, I just plop right in and am actually hot after my swims once in a while.

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    Re: Freakin Cold Water.

    I am used to water colder than the water at san diego. I live on Lake Superior, which is one of the coldest lakes in America. the water temp (where i live) is always around 40-50 degrees in the summer and is frozen half of the year.

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    Re: Freakin Cold Water.

    Cold Showers. I eased into them over the last 2 months. I actually enjoy them now. Have not had a hot shower since, as bad as that may sound.

    I know that they are two different scenerios, but it helps.

    Keith

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    Re: Freakin Cold Water.

    Quote Originally Posted by KeithHutch View Post
    Cold Showers. I eased into them over the last 2 months. I actually enjoy them now. Have not had a hot shower since, as bad as that may sound.

    I know that they are two different scenerios, but it helps.

    Keith
    I used to take cold showers until one day I was like f**k it, I'll stay nice and warm for as long as I can before I get to BUDS. lol

    Just my $0.02.
    Gordon

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    Re: Freakin Cold Water.

    Quote Originally Posted by KeithHutch View Post
    Cold Showers. I eased into them over the last 2 months. I actually enjoy them now. Have not had a hot shower since, as bad as that may sound.

    I know that they are two different scenerios, but it helps.

    Keith
    I used to take cold showers until one day I was like f**k it, I'll stay nice and warm for as long as I can before I get to BUDS. lol

    Just my $0.02.
    Gordon

  12. #12

    Re: Freakin Cold Water.

    Quote Originally Posted by Gordon_075 View Post
    I used to take cold showers until one day I was like f**k it, I'll stay nice and warm for as long as I can before I get to BUDS. lol

    Just my $0.02.
    Gordon
    lol i did the same thing, i said hell if i plan on being wet and cold the rest of my life i might as well take advantage of being warm while it lasts

  13. #13
    Senior Member Lion's Avatar
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    Re: Freakin Cold Water.

    Man, it's been a while since I've been on these forums.

    Gentlemen,
    Do whatever you'd like to do before going to BUD/S. Cold showers, swim in cold rivers, you can even swim in the hot tub; no one gives a ****. It won't prepare you for BUD/S. How many times do you have to read it before you understand this simple fact: making it through BUD/S is mostly a mental challenge. It seems like you don't understand it. The guys who show up on the first day and make it through the last day have already made it in their minds. They could have taken nice hot showers every day up to showing up to Coronado, and the shock from the cold wont phase them, because they already have the frame of mind that they will do what ever it takes to get through. No one is physically fit enough to just shrug off BUD/S, so everyone will suffer in that way. If you are taking cold showers or swimming in cold water months in advance (before you even have a contract), it just means you aren't there mentally, yet.
    "But the bravest are surely those who have the clearest vision of what is before them, glory and danger alike, and yet notwithstanding go out to meet it." - Thucydides
    *08APR2013 SO Contract*

  14. #14

    Re: Freakin Cold Water.

    the cold is nothing..if you really want to prepare for BUD/s buy a boat put it on top of your head and run with in soft sand until you lose control of your bowels and then run 7 more miles with it...
    Strength and Honor
    SWONEC Victor
    HOOYAH

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    Re: Freakin Cold Water.

    Quote Originally Posted by SWONEC 3 View Post
    the cold is nothing..if you really want to prepare for BUD/s buy a boat put it on top of your head and run with in soft sand until you lose control of your bowels and then run 7 more miles with it...
    Lol I've seen you talk about how awful boats on head are a couple times now in the last few days that's something I never really thought about but I could see how much of a toll that must take on your body and also good luck getting back to BUD/s hopefully you'll make it through next time
    "I've worked too hard and too long to let anything stand in the way of my goals. I will not let my teammates down and I will not let myself down."

  16. #16

    Re: Freakin Cold Water.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lion View Post
    Man, it's been a while since I've been on these forums.

    Gentlemen,
    Do whatever you'd like to do before going to BUD/S. Cold showers, swim in cold rivers, you can even swim in the hot tub; no one gives a ****. It won't prepare you for BUD/S. How many times do you have to read it before you understand this simple fact: making it through BUD/S is mostly a mental challenge. It seems like you don't understand it. The guys who show up on the first day and make it through the last day have already made it in their minds. They could have taken nice hot showers every day up to showing up to Coronado, and the shock from the cold wont phase them, because they already have the frame of mind that they will do what ever it takes to get through. No one is physically fit enough to just shrug off BUD/S, so everyone will suffer in that way. If you are taking cold showers or swimming in cold water months in advance (before you even have a contract), it just means you aren't there mentally, yet.
    Great Post.

  17. #17
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    Re: Freakin Cold Water.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lion View Post
    Man, it's been a while since I've been on these forums.

    Gentlemen,
    Do whatever you'd like to do before going to BUD/S. Cold showers, swim in cold rivers, you can even swim in the hot tub; no one gives a ****. It won't prepare you for BUD/S. How many times do you have to read it before you understand this simple fact: making it through BUD/S is mostly a mental challenge. It seems like you don't understand it. The guys who show up on the first day and make it through the last day have already made it in their minds. They could have taken nice hot showers every day up to showing up to Coronado, and the shock from the cold wont phase them, because they already have the frame of mind that they will do what ever it takes to get through. No one is physically fit enough to just shrug off BUD/S, so everyone will suffer in that way. If you are taking cold showers or swimming in cold water months in advance (before you even have a contract), it just means you aren't there mentally, yet.
    Disclaimer: I've never been to BUD/S

    A retired SEAL told me two things a while back: "Most of the mental stress comes from physical pain." The other thing he said, "Guys who were not physically prepared always have a harder time." (No secret). I'm sure there are guys out there who can do enough mental preparation, neglect the physical aspect of it and graduate. I'm sure there are guys out there who are genetic freaks who do no mental prep and could graduate. So unless you're one of those people, I suggest you "educate" yourself now before you get to BUD/S and find out that all your "mental preparation" didn't really get you past shin splints. Or the fact that you can't get over the shock of your air leaving your lungs as you lay down in 48 degree water. Or that you get a ******* migraine when you put weight on your head and neck and run with it. Guys need to know this **** now, not when they're at BUD/S and they DOR, because they weren't prepared. It's easy to say you'll do anything. It's much harder to do it, adding on the sleep deprivation, the cold air and water, the instructors yelling at you cause your back is saggy on your push ups. You think BUD/S is easy enough to just mentally prepare and "decide" in your mind that you'll make it through? You're really going to be that cocky and think you'll just "deal" with all the agony? You underestimate. Easier said than done my friend. You've got to put your nose in the dirt and knock out those push ups. You've got to dunk your noggin in some cold water. You have got to know your limitations before you get to BUD/S, because if you find out there, it's curtains. Find out and work on your limitations and weaknesses now before you get to BUD/S. I'm not saying you can make BUD/S easy. BUD/S is a test, not an exercise program. But it's going to be a helluvalot harder if you're dragging *** because you thought you had mentally "meditated" enough. I'm also not saying guys have to beat themselves senseless. Train smart, obviously. but the bottom line is that you have got to work your *** off to have a shot.

    I think the attitude of "I'm gona make it, no matter what, I'm never gona quit, I'm not gona ring that bell" is just dandy. I also have a feeling that most of the guys who think this way are the first to ring out. Why not take the attitude of, "I'm going to be completely honest with myself, try my very hardest in each evolution I'm in and put out with my boat crew."

  18. #18
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    Re: Freakin Cold Water.

    Look, all I'm saying with the post above is find your limitations (we all have them) and practice going above and beyond them, everyday. It's a skill you can develop: to identify a limitation and exceed it, then exceed that limitation and so-on. But you have to be willing to admit and notice that you do have limitations before you can exceed them, and the only way to find your limitations is to push yourself once in a while... a little everyday. I mean, this stuff doesn't just apply to BUD/S. It applies to any kind of physical hardship. BUD/S's is just at a world-class level way beyond anything else we've ever experienced. But it's the same principle. example: You think the guys about to win gold at this year's olympics just sat there and "meditated" about winning? Hell no, they worked their ***** off before the season and they did it smart, too... I'm just saying you can't rely on mental preparation alone to get you through. You have to get out there and push yourself. Try your best and then do better. Be humble.

    Don't underestimate BUD/S. Don't think that the daily grind for 6 long months won't work you down simply because you think you have this mental chip on your shoulder. Don't think you will never have times where you will be unmotivated and tired and distracted. You're only fooling yourself. Except to yourself that you will get caught up in the moment, that you will have points of mental weakness and come up with a game plan for when those moments come. Because they will come and when they do, your knowledge of your own limitations and knowing how to overcome those (through developing that knowledge of "how" during your months of training prior), your ability to be self-aware... understanding that your boat crew is in as much pain as you are and being there for them, what you write on the underside of your hat or whatever the **** the extras are is what's gona allow you to pull yourself together, re-focus and remember the big picture of why you're there. Develop those skills now, before it's too late.

    One final thing I want to add in this long-winded **** is that there is a difference between "I won't quit" and living in the moment and competing in each evolution. I've heard time and time again that going to BUD/S with the "I'm going to survive, I won't quit BUD/S" attitude means you're already screwed. There is a big difference between not quitting and putting out.

  19. #19
    Senior Member Lion's Avatar
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    Re: Freakin Cold Water.

    You may disagree with what I said, but it doesn't change the fact that when it comes down to it, it really doesn't matter how much you've done beforehand, just the simple fact that you have done it and adjusted to just getting "it" done. How do you explain the months of training soldiers have had before combat, yet when they get to the real thing, some of them still get too mentally frozen to act appropriately? I do agree with you that there will be moments of frustration, exhaustion, and hesitation, but all that matters is that moment, and simply not quitting. You and I obviously aren't on the same page when we are talking about mental preparation.

    You think the guys about to win gold at this year's olympics just sat there and "meditated" about winning? Hell no, they worked their ***** off before the season and they did it smart, too... I'm just saying you can't rely on mental preparation alone to get you through.
    No **** Sherlock. Obviously you have to be physically prepared and develop the mentality to constantly push yourself if you want to be the best. The physical benefits of swimming in cold water is, of course worth gaining. Once you know what the shock of cold water feels like, you only have to go through it so many times before you adapt mentally to simply getting in the water. It's not as if the experience of the shock from cold water changes each time, you'll still have that moment of hesitation each time, that minor adrenaline rush as you're jumping in, your nervous system raging those first few minutes, and then your body's gradual adaptation. All you have to do mentally is learn to get past, and accept, that initial shock and prevent the innate hesitation from hindering you from going any further. All I was saying was that guys who take cold showers every day thinking that it helps them obviously haven't learned to do that yet. I already know that I can just simply jump in cold water and get past that shock. Yeah it's gonna suck, but just do it and get it over with. I'm not saying that there isn't anything else mentally that could become an obstacle, I have no doubt that there is.

    P.S.
    In response to your "cocky" comment, I just want to share a clip from one of my all-time favorite movies:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p890hIa1w9k
    "But the bravest are surely those who have the clearest vision of what is before them, glory and danger alike, and yet notwithstanding go out to meet it." - Thucydides
    *08APR2013 SO Contract*

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    Re: Freakin Cold Water.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lion View Post
    You may disagree with what I said, but it doesn't change the fact that when it comes down to it, it really doesn't matter how much you've done beforehand, just the simple fact that you have done it and adjusted to just getting "it" done. How do you explain the months of training soldiers have had before combat, yet when they get to the real thing, some of them still get too mentally frozen to act appropriately? I do agree with you that there will be moments of frustration, exhaustion, and hesitation, but all that matters is that moment, and simply not quitting. You and I obviously aren't on the same page when we are talking about mental preparation.


    No **** Sherlock. Obviously you have to be physically prepared and develop the mentality to constantly push yourself if you want to be the best. The physical benefits of swimming in cold water is, of course worth gaining. Once you know what the shock of cold water feels like, you only have to go through it so many times before you adapt mentally to simply getting in the water. It's not as if the experience of the shock from cold water changes each time, you'll still have that moment of hesitation each time, that minor adrenaline rush as you're jumping in, your nervous system raging those first few minutes, and then your body's gradual adaptation. All you have to do mentally is learn to get past, and accept, that initial shock and prevent the innate hesitation from hindering you from going any further. All I was saying was that guys who take cold showers every day thinking that it helps them obviously haven't learned to do that yet. I already know that I can just simply jump in cold water and get past that shock. Yeah it's gonna suck, but just do it and get it over with. I'm not saying that there isn't anything else mentally that could become an obstacle, I have no doubt that there is.

    P.S.
    In response to your "cocky" comment, I just want to share a clip from one of my all-time favorite movies:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p890hIa1w9k
    No, I do agree with you. I personally think, though, that the only way to adjust to something is to practice doing it. My point was not that you (when I say "you", I don't mean you, specifically, just incase I am offending you) need to practice getting in cold water just to get in cold water to torture yourself, but to practice and exercise the thought process that allows you to get over that shock, which can be applied to many aspects. Good point about the soldiers. I guess it goes to show that SEALs really are a breed apart. I also get what you meant by how guys haven't gotten past the mental barrier yet and how you only have to do it so many times before you get it. Thanks for taking the time to explain it. I think that's totally true, but for me, even thought I get it already, each time I go for a swim in the creek where I live it gets easier and easier to deal with the cold water, so I think, "Why would I want to stop doing this?" I think that as soon as you enter the water, you know what it's like immediately and can begin to deal with it. I also believe that a certain amount of exposure helps with that and further facilitates one dealing with it better. You and I are more on the same page than we think. The only thing I don't understand from you is the "not going to quit" attitude. I think that there is a lot that goes on before you decide "I won't quit" or hopefully rather "let me get back in the game" and that it isn't so simple in the moment. But we might just have to agree to disagree with that.

    I'm sorry I annoyed you. To me, it sounded like you had this chip on your shoulder and were discounting everyone else's efforts. I apologize for replying to your post in that way and I think you have some really valid points. Best of luck to you.

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