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Pacing the strength evolutions.

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  • Pacing the strength evolutions.

    Okay, so I'm a senior in high school and today my advanced PE class took our one minute push up/sit up tests. We executed strict form, elbows locking out, chest touching the floor and for the sit-ups, we had to have our nose make it between our knees. I managed to do 60 push-ups and 54 sit-ups in the minute. I had some gas left in the tank after the sit-ups test and could've kept going, but on the push-ups I was dead after. My strategy on both exercises is to attack them as fast as I can and get as many as I can in the shortest amount of time while breathing heavily. Should I continue this strategy for the two minute pst, or would it be beneficial to try and "pace"? Thanks for any advice!

  • #2
    Try to keep a cadence/rhythm. It's not necessarily bad to stomp on the gas pedal, but if you can't hold the pace and you burn out really fast, then you're kind of shooting yourself in the foot. The PST push up test is two minutes. If you gas out halfway through the test you're missing out on an entire minute of the test. I think most guys usually bust out roughly forty or fifty push ups at a moderate pace and subsequently bust out sets of several push ups for the remainder of the time. Here's a rough example: If you pump out fifty push ups in the first minute of the test and then proceed to bust out roughly five push ups every ten seconds for the remaining minute you will finish the test with a total of eighty push ups. Of course, you have to remain in the leaning rest position in between push ups. Keep in mind, most mentors prohibit putting your head between your straightened out arms and shoving your butt in the air, so don't do it and don't practice it in your training. Make sure to execute push ups with full range of motion during training; chest touch the floor to elbows locked out. Work on getting better at planks in the push up position, as well. Hope this helps.

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    • #3
      Personally, I've found benefits in attacking the push-ups fast while pacing on the sit-ups.

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      • #4
        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ftxqAxJ39xI

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        • #5
          I'll watch this when I get home, thank you.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Bulldog View Post
            Try to keep a cadence/rhythm. It's not necessarily bad to stomp on the gas pedal, but if you can't hold the pace and you burn out really fast, then you're kind of shooting yourself in the foot. The PST push up test is two minutes. If you gas out halfway through the test you're missing out on an entire minute of the test. I think most guys usually bust out roughly forty or fifty push ups at a moderate pace and subsequently bust out sets of several push ups for the remainder of the time. Here's a rough example: If you pump out fifty push ups in the first minute of the test and then proceed to bust out roughly five push ups every ten seconds for the remaining minute you will finish the test with a total of eighty push ups. Of course, you have to remain in the leaning rest position in between push ups. Keep in mind, most mentors prohibit putting your head between your straightened out arms and shoving your butt in the air, so don't do it and don't practice it in your training. Make sure to execute push ups with full range of motion during training; chest touch the floor to elbows locked out. Work on getting better at planks in the push up position, as well. Hope this helps.
            Good thoughts, I'll give it a try. Thank you.

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