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Regarding NSW-PTG Run Pace Times...

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  • Regarding NSW-PTG Run Pace Times...

    I'll be taking my first official PST in about 5 months. Currently I'm following the Naval Special Warfare Physical Training Guide to prepare but I have a question regarding pace times for SI, LI, and LSD sessions (LSD in particular). I know pace times shouldn't be the focus and it all depends on how you feel, but I'm worried I'm too slow at the moment, and I'd be lying if I said I wasn't quite concerned with passing the weekly 4 mile timed runs in BUD/S. Right now based off my last 9:55 mock PST 1.5 mile run, I shoot for about a ~6:24 mile pace on my SI sessions (1:36 quarter miles), ~7:41 pace for LI, and anywhere from 9:00-9:45 on my LSD sessions. The thing is, these times feel right to me. SI isn't too particularly difficult at the moment as I know should be the case, but LI sessions definitely feel about 8.5/10 currently, and LSD is comfortable but I don't think I'd be able to hit the PTG mileage if I tried going too much faster. Should I be aiming to reduce these pace times over the course of the next few months? Something like a pace of 6:00/7:00/8:00 minute miles for SI, LI, and LSD respectively seems like a good goal but if the pace I'm currently holding feels right according to the workout descriptions then should I just ignore shooting for a certain pace? Really I'm just concerned with the sub 30 minute 4 mile sand runs at BUD/S if I'm currently only hitting that mileage in the low 9 minute mile area.

  • #2
    Originally posted by fitz00000 View Post
    Currently I'm following the Naval Special Warfare Physical Training Guide to prepare but I have a question regarding pace times for SI, LI, and LSD sessions (LSD in particular).
    If you are going to follow the PTG, then follow it: "The intensity of LSD work is low to moderate, so your pace should feel somewhat relaxed. These workouts build endurance and provide relative recovery between more intense sessions. To determine the appropriate intensity, use the Talk Test. You should be able to talk comfortably in short sentences while training, drawing breath between phrases. If you can’t speak, you are working too hard, and if you can speak continually, you are not working hard enough."

    This is also discussed in "Running: Start Here", the thread stickied in this forum which everyone should review for more details on run training. "A simple and accurate way to determine the intensity for LSD is to use the Talk Test. Pay attention to your breathing, and choose a pace that causes you to breath somewhat hard but not too hard. You should b able to talk in short/choppy sentences, not gasping uncontrollably but not making longwinded speeches either. (Some people prefer to monitor their heart rate during training, which requires laboratory stress testing for complete accuracy, but I believe monitoring your breathing is simpler and just as effective for gauging the right pace to enhance endurance without overextending yourself). As your fitness increases, you are able to work at a greater percentage of your max for extended periods without gasping for air, so the Talk Test is self-adjusting relative to your ability."

    You may be slow now, but if you follow a training plan you'll get faster(!) Follow the program guidelines and your training paces will improve as you adapt although the effort will be similar (i.e., moderate for LSD). You say you won't take your first PST for five months; you won't be on the beach at BUD/S for a 4-mile run for a long time yet. Ideally training is a long, slow, steady process, so take your time and let the improvements come at their own pace.

    The Talk Test has been researched considerably. Here are a couple short articles on the topic, if anyone is interested:

    https://www.researchgate.net/profile...9eee8381dc.pdf

    https://s3.amazonaws.com/academia.ed...r_prescrib.pdf
    Mike Caviston
    Director of Fitness, NSWCEN

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Mike Caviston View Post
      If you are going to follow the PTG, then follow it: "The intensity of LSD work is low to moderate, so your pace should feel somewhat relaxed. These workouts build endurance and provide relative recovery between more intense sessions. To determine the appropriate intensity, use the Talk Test. You should be able to talk comfortably in short sentences while training, drawing breath between phrases. If you can’t speak, you are working too hard, and if you can speak continually, you are not working hard enough."

      This is also discussed in "Running: Start Here", the thread stickied in this forum which everyone should review for more details on run training. "A simple and accurate way to determine the intensity for LSD is to use the Talk Test. Pay attention to your breathing, and choose a pace that causes you to breath somewhat hard but not too hard. You should b able to talk in short/choppy sentences, not gasping uncontrollably but not making longwinded speeches either. (Some people prefer to monitor their heart rate during training, which requires laboratory stress testing for complete accuracy, but I believe monitoring your breathing is simpler and just as effective for gauging the right pace to enhance endurance without overextending yourself). As your fitness increases, you are able to work at a greater percentage of your max for extended periods without gasping for air, so the Talk Test is self-adjusting relative to your ability."

      You may be slow now, but if you follow a training plan you'll get faster(!) Follow the program guidelines and your training paces will improve as you adapt although the effort will be similar (i.e., moderate for LSD). You say you won't take your first PST for five months; you won't be on the beach at BUD/S for a 4-mile run for a long time yet. Ideally training is a long, slow, steady process, so take your time and let the improvements come at their own pace.

      The Talk Test has been researched considerably. Here are a couple short articles on the topic, if anyone is interested:

      https://www.researchgate.net/profile...9eee8381dc.pdf

      https://s3.amazonaws.com/academia.ed...r_prescrib.pdf
      Thank you for your reply Mr. Caviston.

      Comment

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