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My Cure for IT Band Pain

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  • #16
    Re: My Cure for IT Band Pain

    UPDATE: Took about a week and a half off of everything having to do with legs. Took the time to foam roll, ice, and stretch a lot. I also took the time to re-evaluate my training methods.

    Fast forward to now: started running with some light 800meter intervals on Wednesday (emphasis on light). Got cleared by my schools sports therapist to run again. The first few days it was a little tight on my warm-up but then it loosened up. And it hasn't hurt since! Had a meet today in the cold and it didn't hurt once. I caught it early enough to not have to take much time off at all. Hopefully this is help to somebody. Thank you, Kempf, for the information.

    Hooyah@@

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    • #17
      Re: My Cure for IT Band Pain

      Great! Now just KEEP UP ON the icing and stretching and do not raise your mileage too quickly.

      Originally posted by JJones View Post
      UPDATE: Took about a week and a half off of everything having to do with legs. Took the time to foam roll, ice, and stretch a lot. I also took the time to re-evaluate my training methods.

      Fast forward to now: started running with some light 800meter intervals on Wednesday (emphasis on light). Got cleared by my schools sports therapist to run again. The first few days it was a little tight on my warm-up but then it loosened up. And it hasn't hurt since! Had a meet today in the cold and it didn't hurt once. I caught it early enough to not have to take much time off at all. Hopefully this is help to somebody. Thank you, Kempf, for the information.

      Hooyah@@
      "Sing your death song, and die like a hero going home." -Tecumseh

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      • #18
        Re: My Cure for IT Band Pain

        Originally posted by iKempf View Post
        Great! Now just KEEP UP ON the icing and stretching and do not raise your mileage too quickly.
        Will do. Thanks dude!

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        • #19
          Re: My Cure for IT Band Pain

          Good Job JJones on keeping patient and reacting to your situation swiftly.

          Has anyone had success with the the abductions when laying on your side? This is only one of many hip stabilization exercises, and it is hard to isolate the medial glute, but a lot of articles point to a weak M.G. as the cause for IT band overruse.

          Quasi-Related point; I am currently experimenting with standing on one foot and bouncing a ball off the wall (for foot/ankle strengthening) and also the slow heel drops off the floor to help with my soleus.
          1.27.15

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          • #20
            Re: My Cure for IT Band Pain

            Unfortunately my IT pain has come back. My hip flexor was what began to hurt first. It felt like I pulled something. It would feel fine when I didn't do anything, but as soon as I started to run or do core (flutter kicks, sit-ups, etc.) It would feel really tight and I would have sharp pain. Fast forward a few weeks. I did my first lower body session in awhile, and after I did squats, the sides of my legs (basically my ITB), and my vastus lateralis (I believe) began to twitch and were really tight. Fast forward again to today. After taking about 4 days off, I went on a 3 mile run with a 1 mile warmup and a 1 mile cooldown. My hip started to hurt about 1.6 miles in, and it got a little worse, but not too much worse, until my run was over. I took a break, sat down and rubbed my hip out with my hands a little bit. Got up and went on my cooldown. At this point I could feel my ITB was really tight, especially down by my knee. I finished the mile cooldown and stretched everything out. Then I got on the computer and researched. Here is what I found: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qlCvKEOZtpo, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e1vf05p1qn8 (I am definitely not a believer in crossfit, I believe it's dangerous and isn't a very solid training program, but that's a discussion for another time. However I believe this video had some good info). https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zyXauxNAmqs

            I rolled out (foam roller and a tennis ball) for about 45 min, with some stretching in between. I believe (because of where the tight muscles are/ the "hot spots" were when I was rolling out) that my problem stems from tight gluteus minimus, gluteus maximus, and tensor fasciae latae.

            With this, I have a few questions.

            1. For all of you physiology guys, could you give me some tips/ critique on what I just said. I understand it all pretty well to some extent, but a little clarification from you guys could be a great help.

            2. I am going to cease running and lower lifting for the time being, but would it be alright to keep swimming as long as I don't scissor kick? I am currently only at the point of doing the drills, I haven't actually gotten to swimming LSD, CHI, or INT yet, so it is pretty low impact.

            Thanks a lot guys!

            HOOYAH!!!
            Last edited by JJones; 12-15-2014, 05:06 PM. Reason: punctuation

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            • #21
              Re: My Cure for IT Band Pain

              I have been researching this topic and it seems that this could be a strengthening issue...here is the article I read. I am not posting the link because of the ROE's, but here is what it says.

              "They call it the ?other? runner?s knee injury. Iliotibial band syndrome was the topic of a special session at the annual meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine earlier this month, and for good reason: While it?s less familiar than the cartilage problems that cause the classic ?runner?s knee,? it remains the second most common running injury , accounting for about 25 per cent of overuse injuries, and also afflicts many cyclists.

              The results presented at the meeting suggest a new approach to dealing with iliotibial band pain. While traditional rehab has focused on lengthening and loosening the stubborn band, early results from a study by the University of Calgary?s Running Injury Clinic show that strengthening the hip muscles may be more effective ? not only for rehab, but for preventing the injury in the first place.

              The iliotibial (IT) band is a tendon-like length of connective tissue that runs along the outside of the leg from the hip to the knee. The classic symptom is pain on the outside of the knee that gets worse after you?ve been running for a while, caused by the IT band pressing in and irritating fat tissue underneath it. Pain at the hip is also possible. The problem is usually blamed on a short, tight IT band, so the typical first line of defence is to relieve pressure by stretching the IT band to lengthen it. One stretch involves thrusting the bad hip outward while balancing on the bad leg and crossing the good leg in front of you ? a complicated move that produces equivocal results.

              ?It?s like yanking on a tough, old piece of leather,? says Reed Ferber, a professor of kinesiology at the University of Calgary and head of its Running Injury Clinic. ?It?s very difficult to actually change its length.?

              More importantly, it?s not clear that the problem is really caused by an IT band that?s too short. In a study presented at the ACSM meeting, researchers from the University of Kentucky compared nine runners with IT band syndrome to healthy controls. To their surprise, they found that the injured runners actually had longer IT bands on average, but weaker hip muscles.

              That suggests that runners with IT band pain should try strengthening their hip muscles ? which is precisely what Dr. Ferber and his colleagues tested. In their pilot data presented at the ACSM meeting, they put nine runners with IT band problems through a six-week rehabilitation protocol that involved stretching, hip-strengthening and using a foam roller to self-massage the IT band.

              The results showed that, despite stretching, the flexibility of the IT band didn?t change. On the other hand, hip strength did increase ? and all nine runners were able to resume running pain-free. Dr. Ferber believes the foam roller acts primarily to dull the pain sensations from the leg rather than cure the root problem (a hypothesis he?s testing separately), leaving hip-strengthening as the key element in the program.

              Since that initial study was completed, Dr. Ferber and his colleagues have treated a total of 23 IT band patients with the six-week protocol, which focuses on the gluteus maximus and gluteus medius muscles. The runners started with about 30-per-cent less hip strength on average than healthy runners, and after correcting this deficiency, all returned to running pain-free.

              Not all cures will be so straightforward. In some cases, the tissue around the IT band may be so inflamed that it is aggravated by just performing the strengthening exercises. Complete rest and anti-inflammatory drugs like ibuprofen may help. Plus, training factors such as running on hilly terrain can inflame IT problems. For cyclists, full leg extension can be a problem; lowering the seat so that the knee never straightens beyond about 30 degrees provides temporary relief.

              Once the acute pain has been relieved strengthening seems to be the best bet. And during that rehab process, runners are encouraged to keep running to whatever extent they can without triggering pain. ?I rarely, if ever, tell people to stop running entirely, except in certain cases like stress fractures,? Dr. Ferber says. ?That?s not the answer ? you have to fix the underlying problem.? "


              I did a lot of hip stabilizer strengthening tonight, and it seems that my hip stabilizers were very tight. After that I foam rolled my ITB. I hope this helps. Any thoughts are welcomed.
              Last edited by JJones; 12-17-2014, 03:49 PM. Reason: info

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