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  • Surviving the cold

    This is a question only for current instructors or members with experience on the subject. What will happen if you're getting frostbite but refuse to quit. Can you be dropped from buds. I can easily handle the cold the mentally, but physically I am skinny at 6'6" and 195 lbs.

  • #2
    Re: Surviving the cold

    I believe hypothermia is the actual concern. Frostbite requires temperatures at or below freezing.

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    • #3
      Re: Surviving the cold

      key components of keeping yourself warm,
      1. keep as much of your head out of the water at all times... do as you're told, but 80% of your body heat leaves through the top of your head
      2. keep your extremities close to your body and your armpits covered. More skin on skin contact...the less water touching your skin.. the better
      3. relax your heart rate, let your body decide where the blood flow needs to go. isolations will keep you from shivering and will provide better "self heating"
      4. You won't really remember any of this while you're there so nevermind

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      • #4
        Re: Surviving the cold

        You're not going to get frostbite in BUD/S. It just doesn't get cold enough. You've got to have below freezing temperatures to get it and it just doesn't get that cold in southern California. Now, hypothermia on the other hand is a strong possibility. However, all the instructors at BUD/S are experts on spotting it and conduct frequent checks, both with electronic instruments and through visual assessments to make sure internal temperatures aren't dropping dangerously low. If you begin to show signs of hypothermia, then you'll get checked out by a doc or by a medic on hand, warmed up and sent back out if it isn't severe enough. I would venture to say though, the instructors are really good at spotting it, so letting it get out of hand doesn't happen.

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        • #5
          Re: Surviving the cold

          Zuke, that seems like some really useful informaton.
          Originally posted by zuke View Post
          isolations will keep you from shivering and will provide better "self heating"
          4. You won't really remember any of this while you're there so nevermind
          On the off chance that we do remember this, what's an isolation and how does it help "self-heating"?
          Seems like a good idea to post the stage of training you are currently in:
          Pre-MEPS until June 2014

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Surviving the cold

            Originally posted by zuke View Post
            key components of keeping yourself warm,
            1. keep as much of your head out of the water at all times... do as you're told, but 80% of your body heat leaves through the top of your head
            2. keep your extremities close to your body and your armpits covered. More skin on skin contact...the less water touching your skin.. the better
            3. relax your heart rate, let your body decide where the blood flow needs to go. isolations will keep you from shivering and will provide better "self heating"
            4. You won't really remember any of this while you're there so nevermind
            Number 1 is a myth, the amount of heat you lose correlates with the surface area, you would lose more heat through your bare thigh than your head, number 2 it won't matter because you're either going to be swimming or interlocked with your class with your arms out, number 3 is bs, you want your body to shiver that is its way of keeping you alive bro, and number 4 is irrelevant because everything you just said is bs.

            You want some real advice? Try to get to buds with some body fat on you, not saying it's going to give you a better experience, but it helps. Super skinny, ripped, cut dudes don't last long, on the rare occasion one does make it though.

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            • #7
              Re: Surviving the cold

              Originally posted by Solid View Post
              Number 1 is a myth, the amount of heat you lose correlates with the surface area, you would lose more heat through your bare thigh than your head, number 2 it won't matter because you're either going to be swimming or interlocked with your class with your arms out, number 3 is bs, you want your body to shiver that is its way of keeping you alive bro, and number 4 is irrelevant because everything you just said is bs.

              You want some real advice? Try to get to buds with some body fat on you, not saying it's going to give you a better experience, but it helps. Super skinny, ripped, cut dudes don't last long, on the rare occasion one does make it though.
              Everything you just said is true. We did some cold water swims this morning with the object of finding good ways to keep our core temperature higher using an ingestible core body transmitter, CoreTemp (by HQ). A friend of mine is a physician and observed and maintained our safety. We swam in the Puget Sound (Seattle Washington), water temp this morning was between 47-49 degrees fahrenheit.

              Keeping your head out of the water is still a good idea though, a cold head is more miserable than cold arms and legs, However there was a noticeable difference between temperatures with head in the water as opposed to out, we assumed this to be related to the flexing of the abdominal muscles and not to the actual contact of water to the head.
              Shivering greatly increases body heat, this is true, however it rapidly depletes muscle glucose and wears you out faster. Isolations will greatly reduce muscle fatigue and we found that our core temp was raised quicker with deep breathing and Isolations than shivering on its own.

              And after one of the most unpleasant mornings Iv'e ever had, the best advice we could come up with was:

              ...eat more..

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              • #8
                Re: Surviving the cold

                If you go hypothermic, you will be warmed up. There is a tub kept at a certain temperature that you can be taken to and immersed until your core temperature is back within acceptable levels. Then you go back to training/the surf. Rinse and repeat when necessary. I've never been to BUD/s; this information is coming from **** Couch's Warrior Elite.

                It is my understanding that the balance between getting wet and physical activity is planned with temperature concerns in mind. You are constantly monitored for signs of hypothermia, and there are limits placed on time in the water given a certain temperature. Yes, you are going to be beyond bitter cold for agonizingly long periods of time. No, you aren't going to be in danger of frostbite.

                This isn't some movie where you are dropped off in the middle of the ocean/******/glacier and have to fight a shark/tiger/polar bear with the shiv you made from the rib you broke while jumping from the helo without a fastrope (because let's be honest, ropes are for the weak). This is reality; high intensity physical/mental training that pushes trainees to their breaking point over and over. It seems to me that anyone in BUD/s training has demonstrated the potential to be developed into a highly valued asset to the US Navy. In what world would it make sense for the Navy to let BUD/s trainees to get frostbite?

                I find the idea of physical tricks to overcome the cold humorous. Body fat is the only usable piece of advice here, and it has other drawbacks in training. Not to be rude, but my personal opinion is just **** up and take it. Keep it simple can sometimes be the best advice.

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                • #9
                  Re: Surviving the cold

                  i assume your body will some what get used to the cold? like when a person who lives in colder whether tends to have a higher resistance to cold than a person who lives in warmer whether

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                  • #10
                    Re: Surviving the cold

                    Thanks for the supply of info. The only thing I really needed to know is if you get dropped for going hypothermic. I have been taking cold showers every morning (outside temp at about 6:00 in California) for a few years to start getting ready.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Surviving the cold

                      Originally posted by tfranc View Post
                      You're not going to get frostbite in BUD/S. It just doesn't get cold enough. You've got to have below freezing temperatures to get it and it just doesn't get that cold in southern California. Now, hypothermia on the other hand is a strong possibility. However, all the instructors at BUD/S are experts on spotting it and conduct frequent checks, both with electronic instruments and through visual assessments to make sure internal temperatures aren't dropping dangerously low. If you begin to show signs of hypothermia, then you'll get checked out by a doc or by a medic on hand, warmed up and sent back out if it isn't severe enough. I would venture to say though, the instructors are really good at spotting it, so letting it get out of hand doesn't happen.
                      What happens if the hypothermia is severe?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Surviving the cold

                        you still wont have to worry about it, If an instructor sees that you are showing signs of hypothermia... you get pulled aside... get your core temp checked by whatever medical staff is there and they will help you out. The time you spend in the water is calculated, this is not just some sort of hazing wher they tell you to get wet and sandy and don't think about the consequences.

                        Either you can suck it up and deal with the cold like everyone else... or your just not cut out for the job

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Surviving the cold

                          Originally posted by zuke View Post
                          Isolations will greatly reduce muscle fatigue and we found that our core temp was raised quicker with deep breathing and Isolations than shivering on its own.
                          Again, what are isolations? thanks in advance.
                          Seems like a good idea to post the stage of training you are currently in:
                          Pre-MEPS until June 2014

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Surviving the cold

                            Originally posted by Zeke1997 View Post
                            Again, what are isolations? thanks in advance.
                            when you flex individual muscles

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