Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Question for Mr Caviston.

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Re: Question for Mr Caviston.

    Originally posted by IRunMan View Post
    Counting pushups - 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9, 1; 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 2.... This is not only an easier way to count pushups, but it breaks down a larger set into sets of 10.
    For some reason, I have never heard of that before. I just tried it, and it definately works for me. I set a goal of 50, achieved it, and was able to do another 20. the 50 without 10 count felt the same as the 70 with 10 count!
    Seems like a good idea to post the stage of training you are currently in:
    Pre-MEPS until June 2014

    Comment


    • #17
      Re: Question for Mr Caviston.

      That's they way they count in the military, too. 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10 ; 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,20 ; 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,30 ; etc.

      Comment


      • #18
        Re: Question for Mr Caviston.

        Originally posted by IRunMan View Post
        It isn't about not looking forward - you absolutely need to be looking towards the goal/future. It is about not being intimidated into inaction by the immensity of reps/distance/effort between your current position and the goal. Breaking that immense goal down into smaller steps helps.

        Here is an example that many people may not think about, but probably do. Counting pushups - 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9, 1; 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 2.... This is not only an easier way to count pushups, but it breaks down a larger set into sets of 10. I know it sounds like mind games (which is exactly what it is), but I am always surprised to find this works. On a set of 50, when I do a straight count, I can feel this mental block when I get to 25-30 and I start getting muscle fatigue and thinking 'man I've got a lot of reps left.' When I do 10 counts, the reps are the same but I am just focused on finishing that 10 count. I'm not stupid - I know the number of reps are the same, but don't underestimate the effect your mentality can have on training.

        If you find yourself hyperfocused on the big goal that seems far away, that is where positive self-talk and visualization can come into play. Embrace your fear of failure and channel it into training. Ignoring it or pretending it doesn't exist is the worst thing you could do in my opinion.

        For me, the days where I feel like I am behind the training curve is when I push it the most. There are always days where you feel sluggish or like things aren't going your way. On days like that, I sometimes hop on here and look at some of the ridiculously impressive PST scores I am competing against. I tell myself - "If another human can do this, I can do it with the correct preparation and work ethic" and "If they can do this, why can't you." Perhaps I am different than some, but nothing makes me motivated like feeling inadequate. Then some more self talk - "I will not be a burden; I will pull my weight; I will not fail." At that point, I am ready to hit the workout with full momentum. It is certainly a negative feeling, but I use it as my fuel to work towards a positive outcome.

        Long story short - find what truly motivates you. It may be idea, or perhaps a way of thinking. Whatever it is, ride it for all its worth.
        Way to say it much more eloquently than me.

        Comment

        Working...
        X